Tag Archives: Volunteering

In Ten Years’ Time

I had the “kitchen table talk” yesterday. This is the official term for the meeting with your local social consultant to determine your need for services funded through the community support act. The meeting went well, though not much is clear. I’ll be eligible for supports, but I first need to go to the mental health agency near the tiny village to discuss my treatment there. After all, if I go into day treatment or assertive community treatment, part of the services from mental health will overlap with supports I’d be eligible for through the community support act. I’ll push my psychologist to get me an appointment with mental health as soon as possible. The consultant officially has to make a decision on community supports within six to eight weeks.

This has me looking ahead to my life with my husband. I hope to move in with my husband this summer. My mother-in-law had somehow gotten the idea that I’ll be leaving the institution in August, because she asked me how I felt about discharge. I have no clue where she got the idea that I’ll be discharged this August from, but I hope she’s right. After the kitchen table talk, I am somewhat more excited about leaving the institution than I was before. It’s still scary, but it’s a little less scary at least.

I was just looking at the 30-day recovery challenge from BelieveInRecovery.com. ONe of the challenges is to describe where you hope to be in ten years. I already wrote a letter to my future self in 2014. Today, I am going to take it a little easier and just fantasize about my life in ten years’ time.

Ten years ago, I resided in an independent living training home for the disabled. I had made the decision to postpone university till 2007, but had not yet found something to study for 2006. The idea that I am autistic had not been picked up by the staff yet. I was still, in other words, “just blind”. And miserable.

Now, ten years later, I’m not as miserable but still not very happy. I hope that in ten years, I’ll be more comfortable in my own skin than I am now. I obviously hope that I’ll have lost the almost 20kg that I’m overweight.

In the past ten years, if you look at the larger scheme of things, not much has changed. My parents at one point came to talk to my doctor at the locked unit and told him that I’d gone from the rehabilitation center for the blind to the training home and from the training home into a psychiatirc hospital. They overlooked the three months that I’d lived independently, but in the larger scheme of things, how much do these matter?

I hope to change more in the ten years to come than in the past ten years. However, I’m afraid to dream big now. I mean, in an ideal world, I’d go back to school and complete a program in counseling or psychology. Not to be an employed counselor, but just for the knowledge of it. I’d be doing volunteer work helping people navigate the social services field. I’ll have written and published my autobiography. Maybe I’ll do some freelance writing – if I can manage to learn to type properly. I had at least five typeos in that sentence.

One thing that changed within the past ten years and that I hope won’t change within the next ten years, is my relationship status. Ten years ago, I was single and clueless about relationships. Now, I’m still clueless but apparently doing an okay job at loving someone. I hope to still love and be loved by my husband ten years from now.

J – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

Welcome to the letter J post in my #AtoZChallenge on mental health. This is one of the hardest letters – I mistyped it in the theme reveal. I’ve come up with just two words and they’re not very related.

Jobs

Mentally ill people are particularly likely to be unemployed. Like I said when discussing experience, some institutions create special jobs for people with mental illness to work as recovery or experience workers. These are paid jobs not suited for people in long-term inpatient care, although they are very suitable for people who have overcome a long-term institution life. People still in long-term care can become part of a recovery group. This is often seen as volunteer work and earns you around €10,- for two hours a week of attendance.

People who are long-term institution patients of course have to do something during the day. Some of these activities are simple industrial or administrative duties. At my old institution, these were purely seen as day activities and didn’t earn you any momey. At my current institution, patients doing this work earn like €1,- an hour. That’s still only a small percentage of what people in regular employment earn, of course – minimum wage islike €10,-. People doing this type of work often still call it their “job”. People doing creative day activities usually don’t.

Juvenile

Children can get mentally ill too, of course. I recently read that as many as 30% of children in the UK have a diagnosed psychiatric disorder. Now I assume this includes autism and ADHD, which are not always seen as a mental illness. However, among older children and adolescents is also a significant number of sufferers of depression, anxiety and eating disorders. Even among younger children, mental illness can happen. I even heard of psychiatrists specializing in infant and toddler mental health.

Most mental health agencies serve people of all ages, but there are also separate children’s mental health agencies, especially for inpatient treatment. Even those agencies that serve all ages have separate units and treatment teams for children and adolescents. In the Netherlands, after all, child mental health care is regulated by the Youth Act rather than the various laws regulating adult mental health care.