Tag Archives: Vitamins

V – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

Welcome to the letter V post in the #AtoZChallenge on mental health. Pfew, we’ve arrived at the last week and I’m looking forward to writing regular posts once again. This letter wasn’t too hard though. Here goes.

Visiting Hours

Mental hospitals, like most hospitals, have visiting hours. The difference is that they are particularly meant for patients from other units. Family often can come when they want.

Vitamins

Many mental institution patients take one or more vitamins or minerals. The reason is that many don’t have the healthiest diets and hence run a risk of vitamin deficiency. However, it is also thought that vitamin deficiencies may contribute to people’s mental illness. For example, depression may be associated with vitamin D deficiency.

Voice-Hearing

Many people with severe mental illnesses hear voices. Many people without severe mental illness do too, but they can function in spite of their voice-hearing. As such, voice-hearing itself does not indicate severe mental illness, even though until recently, you could be diagnosed with schizophrenia by merely hearing voices.

There is an international movement of voice-hearers. The most well-known organization supporting this movement is Intervoice in the UK. Intervoice aims to support people who hear voices, whether they’ve been diagnosed with a mental illness such as schizophrenia or not.

Core values of the hearing voices movement are:


  • Hearing voices, seeing visions and related phenomena are meaningful experiences that can be understood in many ways.

  • Hearing voices is not, in itself, an indication of illness, though difficulty coping with voices can lead to great distress.

  • When people are overwhelmed by their experiences, support should be based on respect, empathy, informed choice and an understanding of the personal meaning of this person’s voice-hearing.

Volunteers

Many mental hospitals and support organizations for people with severe mental illness employ volunteers. Volunteers might be visiting buddies, visiting the patient every so often. They may also help paid staff during day activities. My institution isn’t keen on employing volunteers. There was this staff member who would be laid off due to budget cuts and she offered to come back as a volunteer. The management said “No”, because volunteers cost some money too.

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Vitamin B12 Deficiency: The Invisible But Treatable and Worryingly Common Disease

In the summer of 2012, I suffered from severe, persistent fatigue and episodes of lightheadedness. I went to my doctor, thinking I had iron deficiency anemia once again. My hemoglobin was always normal, but the ironn itself, which is necessary in the production of hemoglobin, had often been low. This time around, however, the cause of my fatigue was vitamin B12 deficiency.

Vitamin B12 deficiency is relatively common but used to be underestimated. It affects between three and six percent of the population, becoming more common as people age (Allen, 2009).

Vitamin B12 deficiency is usually diagnosed through a blood test. A deficiency is defined as a serum level of B12 below 148 pMol/L or 200 pg/mL (Allen, 2009). My level at the time was 120 pMol/L, which my doctor said was “not very low”. This may be so – I have met people on the B12 deficiency foundation forum with levels of 25 or less -, but it’s still cause for concern. Besides, my methylmalonic acid (MMA) was also elevated, which Allen says is the “gold standard” for diagnosing B12 deficiency.

Symptoms of B12 deficiency can be diverse. I only had tiredness and lightheadedness, but you may also experience rapid heartbeat or breathing, pale skin, sore tongue, weakness, an upset stomach, diarrhea or constipation. If B12 deficiency is not treated, it could lead to nerve damage. In fact, Chris Kresser, a natural health specialist, thinks that some symptoms common in the elderly, such as cognitive decline and lessened mobility, may in fact be due to untreated B12 defieciency. Kresser also cites a much higher prevalence than Allen, but this seems to be due to bias.

It is the Dutch B12 deficiency foundation’s position that, unless you’re eating strictly vegan, the cause of B12 deficiency is most likely malabsorption and you need to insist on injections. Malabsorption can, according to WebMD, be due to various causes, such as atrophic gastritis (where the lining of your stomach becomes very thin), pernicious anemia, Crohn’s or Celiac Disease, etc. However, eating a vegetarian diet with few eggs or dairy, as I did, can also cause low B12 levels. I went with injections anyway because I hated the taste of the tablets.

It is also the B12 deficiency foundation’s position that measuring serum levels after you’ve been using injections, won’t be useful. In my case, I was given blood tests after the round of injections anyway, and these showed my B12 level was elevated in fact. It dropped to normal within a few months and stayed within the normal range until at least my last blood test in December of 2013. I eat meat again, so it could be that my low consumption of animal products, even though I wasn’t strictly vegan, was causing me to have a B12 deficiency.

Reference

Allen LH (2009), How Common Is Vitamin B12 Deficiency? American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 89(2):693S-696S. DOI: 10.3945/‚Äčajcn.2008.26947A.