Tag Archives: Snoezelen

Day Activities #WotW

Oh man, I haven’t written in nearly two weeks. This isn’t unheard of on my blog over the past year or so, but it does feel a little weird, given that I fully intended on writing more in May. I have now been home from the mental institution for two weeks and it’s going better than expected. I’m of course still having my ups and downs, but I haven’t been in a full-blown crisis yet.

As I mentioned in my last post, I started day activities May 9. It was really hard at first. Like I said, the group I’ve been placed in does simple manual labor like packaging and sorting tasks. I found this boring and difficult at the same time. Last week though, I found an activity that is useful as well as doable for me. It’s making paper props. That sounds incredibly dumb and useless, but paper props are used to store paint cans with, so that the paper will absorb the paint should a can leak. My staff said this activity drives her crazy, but it truly is a sensory friendly activity to me.

Last week, we also did some gardening. I don’t like my hands getting dirty, so I had trouble with this activity. However, while going to the garden, someone mentioned a set of swings. I at first thought the swings were only to be used by those with more severe disabilities. Then someone from my group went on them, so I asked the staff whether I could use them too. It was fun!

However, the best activity yet was snoezelen. This Wednesday, I was very irritable, the staff took me to a room. “Have you heard of the snoezelen room?” he asked. I had heard of this and had in fact asked my treatment team at the institution if I could try this at the intellectual disability unit about a year ago. They said “No.” After all, I wouldn’t be able to do this once home. Snoezelen was developed in the Netherlands and there isn’t a proper English term for it. It is a particular type of sensory play. Basically, in a snoezelen room, the service user or their staff can control the entire sensory enviornment. For example, there are lights, soothing music, soft spots to sit in, etc. I haven’t discovered all there is to this room yet. Maybe tomorrow, the staff will show me around.

on Thursday and Friday, when I became slightly irritable, the staff took me to the snoezelen room again. On Friday, the staff asked if I would like to have this in my daily schedule. I felt a little weird, as I had gotten the idea from my institution treatment team that this is only for people with severe intellectual disabilities. The staff however said that if it helps me, it’s fine.

I’m choosing “day activities” as my word for the week. Next week, we’ll unfortunately have Thursday ad Friday off, but I’m hoping to enjoy Monday through Wednesday mornings there.

The Reading Residence

Being Powerful, Empowered, Mighty: Making My Needs Known

Today, I actually feel like writing about an experience I had this week, when I created my list of support needs and concerns for when I’m going to live with my husband. I particuarly wanted to write about my various ideas on day activities. Then again, I wanted my post to be prompt-based and have some direction and preferably be suited for a linky. Then I saw that this week’s prompt from mumturnedmom is “mighty”. Well, it was quite an empowering experience and a mighty experience at that. I don’t know whether “mighty” means the exact same as “powerful” or “empowered” and I believe these don’t even mean the same, but who cares? I am empowered, I am powerful, I am mighty, for I can make decisions on my care needs.

Seriously though, this is really empowering. After all, up until last week, I thought all responsibility for making this whole living with my husband thing work lay with me, but all control lay with my treatment team. Late last week, I was ranting about this in a Facebook group for people with borderline personality disorder and someone else said just the right things to get my butt moving. Or rather my fingers. She didn’t say much and I can hardly remember what she actually said, but I was inspired to finally start wrting down my support needs and concerns. My psychologist had been pushing me to do this, but I didn’t know how.

The first thing was about medication: who makes sure I get my meds on time, checks when I’ve run out and gets me a new supply from the pharmacy? Can I get a periodic med review with a psychiatrist? Then came concerns about my handling distress: whom to call and when f I’m in distress? What can I do myself? What needs to be done if I end up in a dangerous situation? Then came concerns about activities of daily living like making coffee (which I can do myself), preparing and serving myself food and suchlike. I didn’t have answers to many of these questions in all of these areas, except that i need to get supported day activities.

I E-mailed my list of concerns to my named nurse and was discussing day activities and recreation with her. My husband had made a few suggestions last week, but I was brainstorming with my named nurse too. I reasoned that I’d like to get my day activities from a developmental disability service provider rather than one for mental health, because they are usually more equipped to accommodate multiple disabilities and sensory needs.

Suddenly something popped up into my mind that I’d said to a nurse at my old institution a few years ago: that I’d like to try snoezelen. Snoezelen is a Dutch term with no proper English translation, but it means that a person with a developmental disability is allowed into a room which is equipped with materials to soothe and stimulate the senses. The sensory environment is completely controlable. It is also safe, like with soft walls and such, because most people who use this type of service have behavioral challenges.

I expected my nurse to ridicule me for proposing this, but she completely got me. My activiyt staff, whom I told the next day, said the institution has a snoezel room at the unit for people with intellectual disabilities and I may get approval to try it there. Of course, since this service is usually provided to people with intellectual disabilities, I may not be approved and if I do get approved, I may not be able to get along with the other clients. Well, screw that last one, which was holding my staff at the old institution back: I can hardly get along with most of my current fellow patients either.

Now I wrote my psychologist, but didn’t talk about the snoezelen idea, because I fear she will most definitely ridicule me. She seems so focused on my intelligence and my mental illness rather than my autism and sensory needs, after all. I did ask my named nurse to go with me to my next meeting with my psychologist so that she might advocate for me.

I also discussed my need for day acitivities in various Facebook groups for autism and other disabilities. Other ideas provided were yoga, swimming, trampolining (on a low trampoline) and gardening. My activity staff also said I need multiple activities that I can do during the week. If I end up swimming or doing yoga, I would like to do it at a day activity center, because then the instructors would be more accommodating than when I’d go to a regular gym or pool.

I feel much more positive, much more empowered than I did last week, even though many people or agencies may still get in the way. Like, my psychologist or social worker may refuse to refer me to a developmental disability service. Then again, my social worker said I need to do the meeting with the governnment people who decide on funding myself. These people might refuse to contract a developmental disability agency for me, or the agencies I have in mind might all turn me down. Still, if I don’s stand up for what I believe I need, I won’t definitely get things done my way.

mumturnedmom
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