Tag Archives: Sensory Overload

Self-Destructive

So #Write31Days didn’t work out, but not because I couldn’t be motivated to write. The reason was that, on Wednesday, I landed in crisis, took an overdose of medication and had to be taken to the hospital. I spent the night on the internal medicine ward and was medically cleared the following day. However, it took till around 5PM before I could see the consulting psychiatrist. She was a nice woman. I knew her nurse from the other time I’d taken an overdose last July. Nothing much has yet been decided, as the psychiatrist will speak to my CPN on Monday, but I was cleared to go home.

Today, I want to talk about harmful and self-destructive behavior as it happens in various mental disorders. Particularly, I want to relate it to what I assume are my current diagnoses: autism spectrum disorder and borderline personality disorder. Unlike what many people believe, the reasons for harmful behaviors are not either fully due to autism or fully due to BPD.

In autism, self-injury and aggression are common, but are seen as steretypical behaviors. For example, some autistics hit themselves as a form of self-stimulation. However, there is a common behaviorist phrase that says all behavior is communication. As such, autistics often also engage in self-injurious behavior to communicate pain, overload or frustration.

Here is where the lines between autism and BPD become blurry. After all, unlike what is commonly believed, borderlines don’t self-destruct “for attention” or “to manipulate”. Most self-harm to deal with strong emotions that they perceive as overwhelming. Whether these emotions come from within the person themself (as is often the case in BPD) or from external sources of frustration, may seem to be important, but it isn’t. A situation doesn’t make you self-destruct, after all. It’s each person’s choice, within the limits of their mind’s capacity at that particular point.

The reason I took an overdose on Wednesday, isn’t fully clear to me either. I do remember feeling sensorially overloaded with cold. I tried to warm up by going on the elliptical trainer. After all, I needed my exercise too, as I hadn’t worked out all week. I couldn’t find my sneakers or my sports clothes, so I tried for a bit to work out in my regular clohes, except for my vest. I was shivering though and this overloaded me even more. From that point, I don’t rmemeber much. I was feeling rather unreal, though I must’ve had some awareness of what I was doing, as I retrieved medications from various sources. Once the first pill bottle, which was the easiest to find, was down, I didn’t feel there was a way back.

So is this typical borderline behavior? Yes, in that it’s not stereotyped and was rather purposeful. It certainly wasn’t the stereotypical “cry for help” type of BPD behavior though. I didn’t want to call the out-of-hours GP and I had zero interest in being admitted to a mental hospital. I do think I need some more guidance, but not in the sense of somemone providing me emotional nurture.

In the sense of what caused it, it’s more autistic sensory overload and difficulty handling unexpected situations and frustrations. The help I requested when talking to the consulting psychiatrist was of such nature: I need some practical guidance on getting more structure in my day and dealing with unexpected situations. It may be my home support worker could provide this, or I may need my nurse from the assertive community treatment team for this. I also remember just now having discussed with my nurse a prescription phone call. This means that you can call (usually I think a max number of times a week or month) to a psych unit for support if you’re about to go into crisis. I will ask my CPN about this.

What Sensory Overload Is Like

Today on The Mighty, there’s a story about people’s misguided perceptions of sensory overload. Mandy Farmer, the post author, describes several situations involving her son that are well-known to me. Though I’ve come to tolerate a grocery store, I still cover my ears when the music in a store is too loud. I still fidget and, though I don’t (usually) scream, I still react with frustration at my hair being cut. I still don’t attend many social events, because I find a baby’s crying or loud music or even lots of conversation overwhelming.

Overwhelming, exactly. But you see just behavior. I’ve actually had some nurses tell me that “this is behavior”. Duh! Every single action a person exhibits is behavior. You mean it is willful misbehavior, but 1. you don’t say so (this is my literal-mindedness acting up) and 2. I don’t think that it is.

People often see sensory overload as attention-seeking, as depriving the noise-making people of the right to make noise. *Yes, I’ve seriously been accused of that!) At best, like Farmer also seems to connote, they see it as anxiety, and anxiety is to be overcome with exposure.

I once, many years ago, read a description of what it is like to live with autism. The description of the sensory experience went something like this: imagine noise at the highest volume blasting in your ears, insects crawling under your skin, and bright lights shining in your eyes at the same time, while you’re having to eat the hottest type of peppers and the smell of rotten meat penetrates your skin. I bet those last two weren’t in there, but sensory overload affects all five senses. Now imagine not being able to escape any of these sensory experiences. Imagine what it’d be like having this experience 24/7. You’d go freakin’ nuts!

Sensory overload doesn’t always involve a cognitive appraisal of the sensory stimulation, like: “I don’t think people should be playing loud music.” It doesn’t even always involve fear-related appraisals, like: “This noise is a threat, I feel like it will damage my ears.” When it does involve these types of cognitive processes, we aren’t always aware of them. Older children and adults can learn to become aware of what is going on in their minds and register any fearful or angry thoughts they may have towards the sensory stimulus. Then they can begin to learn to adjust these thoughts. But when there are no such thoughts, or when the person is unaware of them, how will attributing their reactions to some type of willful behavior help them?

If noise were blasting at the loudest volume, bright lights were shining into your eyes, insects were crawling under your skin, etc., wouldn’t you feel pain? You would! Think of sensory overload as pain. And while cognitive and behavioral strategies can help people manage pain, attributing their pain-related behaviors to willfulness is not only insensitive, but ineffective as well.

Everyday Gyaan

Ten Patches This Autistic Person Could Use

The Golden Spoons

This is my first time participating in the Tuesday Ten. I’ve been wanting to for a while, but usually I found other things to blog about on Tuesday. Either that, or I simply forgot. The theme for this week is “I need a patch for that”, because this is the weird holdiay celebration tomorrow. Lisa of The Golden Spoons, one of the hosts, wrote ten patches every mother needs. I got thinking about that. I’m not a Mom, so I can’t really expand on those. Then I got thinking: what would I like patches for? And here’s a list of pathes this autistic person would need. Some of them can be seen as “cures” for certain symptoms of autism, while others are work-around patches and still others are patches for the social stigma and misunderstanding I encoutner.


  1. An anti-overload patch. Even though traditional autistic advocates say they would never take medication to hear or feel less, I certainly would. The thing about a patch, however, is that I can put it on and take it off again, unlike the daily medication I currently take for overload-caused irritability.

  2. An energy patch. Stole this one from Lisa, but I too think I could benefit from it. Living as an autistic can be quite exhausting, after all.

  3. A tolerance patch. To put on others when they have a strikingly intolerant attitude. Mostly staff, that is, so I don’t know how I’d get them to put it on, given that their attitude would prevent them from seeing they need it.

  4. A translation patch. I usually misunderstand people and, rather than putting on a “communicate like a neurotypical” patch, I’d like a translator that sits between me and the neurotypical.

  5. An easy text-to-speech patch. While we’re communicating anyway, I’d like to be able to write rather than speak. While text-to-speech apps are already available, I’d like one that I can easily use and that doesn’t make me look like a weirdo. I’d also like it to translate from speech to text (or braille, in my case). I’ve honestly been thinking of wanting a Communicator, which is a device used by deafblind people, but they’re very expensive and I’m not eligible for funds. i’m verbal, after all.

  6. A patience patch. Again, this one is stolen from Lisa, and I’d like to put it on others again, though I could myself use some patience at times.

  7. A perseveration patch. The good thing about patches again is the ability to put them on and take them off. Today, I’ve been looking everywhere for some perseveration, while at other times, I’m totally immersed in my special interest.

  8. An antidepressant patch. I don’t suffer from clinical depression, but I do have days when I’m very depressed. Again, like the anti-overload patch, this would seem like a better alternative to my current daily antidepressant.

  9. A patchwork weighted blanket: Lisa said patches can be any sort, so patchwork quilts are included. I’ve always wanted a weighted blanket, but never took the effort to find myself one.

  10. An executive functioning patch: something like an anti-procrastination patch, but it’ll also break down difficult tasks into smaller, easy-to-follow steps.

Note that every autistic person is different. This is why I referred to “this autistic person” in my post title rather than “every autistic person”. If you’ve met one autistic person, you’ve met one autistic person, after all. If you’d like to contribute what patches you could use in life, write a list of ten and hop over to Lisa’s blog to submit it.

Handling Tantrums and Meltdowns in Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Many children with autsitic spectrumd isorders, including pathological demand avoidance syndrome, have meltdowns. They can have different causes. A child may act out because they’re impulsive and find it hard to delay gratification. This is different from being spoiled, although the difference may be subtle. I still act out when I ask for help and am not told when I can get it. If someone is clear when they can offer me what I need (I don’t act out for not getting something I merely want, for clarity’s sake), I usually don’t have a meltdown.

On the other hand, as a child, even up to early adolescence, I used to have tantrums when my sister got candy or a gift and I didn’t. This is not normal for a neurotypical adolescent, but that doesn’t make it not a tantrum. An autistic child beyond the typical age for temper tantrums may not be able to take the other person’s perspective, so they may feel they’re being mistreated. This can be explained in a social story, but if a child still tantrums when they’re simply not getting their way, treating it as a regular temper tantrum is best.

Some children or adults act out because they’re frustrated and don’t knwo how to solve a problem. This is something inbetween a temper tantrum and a meltdown. I often used to be frustrated if my computer was having problems, but I would not use strategieis that would solve the problem, either socially acceptable (asking for help) or not (screaming for help). In one case when I was sixteen, I totaled my computer trying to make it work again, losing five months worth of important documents.

According to Adelle Jameson Tilton and Charlotte E. Thompson, authors of The Everything Parent’s Guide to Children with Autism, 2nd edition, a child can also have a meltdown because they’re denied something they want, but they lose total behavioral control and don’t “switch off” suddenly again if the wish is granted. Children in a meltdown do not take precautions to prevent themselves from being injured. They will not care if someone is watching or reacting, and the meltdown winds off gradually. I had meltdowns often when I was at the independence training home, throwing objects in my own apartment while no-one was there. I did need help cleaning up the mess, but usually I had calmed down and wasn’t asking for what I had originally wanted once the staff helped me clean up.

From my experience, I can tell that a meltdown can also occur when I am overloaded either cognitively, emotinally or sensorially. I remember a few weeks ago completely melting down even though I had gotten the attention I’d wanted already, because I couldn’t cope with overwhelming emotions and had failed at channeling my overload. When later asked why I had had this meltdown, I had no clue. This is in my experience a distinctive characteristic of a meltdown: meltdowns do not necessarily have an underlying reason.

Meltdowns can also happen after a small seizure, according to Jameson Tilton and Thompson. I read in my neuropsychology textbook that aggression during a seizure is very rare and usually stereotyped, but aggression after a seizure may be more common. If a child seems to be totally uninvolved in their environment for a few minutes before mtling down, this could be a sign of a silent seizure.

In children with pathological demand avoidance particularly, a meltdown may come on as a result of anxiety. Phil Christie and others in their book Understandign Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome in Children, make a rigid distinction between aggression with the purpose of avoiding demands and meltdowns out of anxiety, but in my experience this distinction isn’t always clear. After all, demand avoidance often stems from anxiety and/or overload. In situations where an autistic or PDA child is overloaded or panicking, it is important that adults reduce the demands placed on the child, use simple language and do not enforce social niceties such as eye contact.

It may help to evaluate your own behavior as the adult managing a child’s meltdown. You can ask yourself whether the demands you placed on the autistic or PDA child were reasonable, whether they were truly non-negotiable (so that you were willing to endure a meltdown for them), whether you reacted properly or may’ve overreacted, etc. Remember, a meltdown, unlike a temper tantrum, is not a power play, and as a parent, carer or teacher you shouldn’t make it about power.

If the person who had the meltdown is an older child or adult, and you have a trusting relationship with them, involve them too in the evaluation process. (Note: if you do not have a trusting relationship with them, this is something you’ll need to work on!) Evaluating should be done in a non-judgmental way, avoiding the blame game. For some children, social stories may be appropriate, while others can tell you what you need to do differently to help them prevent or minimize a meltdown. This is again not to say that you’re to blame for the meltdown, but many children and adults in a meltdown do need external support.

What Does Mild Autism Mean?

Yesterday, I had a discussion with a nurse, who said that I am very mildly autistic, if I’m autistic at all (which she can’t comment on of course). This got me thinking, because I know that in some respects, I’m not stereotypically autistic, but then again, that’s not the same as not being significatly affected by autism, is it? I am for this reason posting an updated version of a post I wrote several years ago about what mild autism is. I wrote a list of common assumptions similar to the one on high-functioning vs. low-functioning autism, and am going to add some more.

  • Mild autism means Asperger’s Syndrome. This is a common assumption among auitsm advocates trying to discredit people with an Asperger’s diagnosis. Indeed, it is true that people with Asperger’s diagnoses in DSM-IV-TR must not have significant impairments in cognitive or language abilities, but having an IQ above 70 and being able to speak, says little about real-life functioning.I know that adaptive functioning cannot have been impaired in early development either. In this case, I was misdiagnosed with Asperger’s, but then again maybe my adaptive functioning impairments were presumed to be due to blindness. The DSM-IV-TR expanded text uses other differentiation criteria, like “active but odd” vs. “passive” social behavior. Again, I am passive, as are most women on the autism spectrum.
  • Mild autism means the person has an IQ above 70 (or 85, in some cases). This doesn’t say anything about one’s autism, but about the presence or absence of comorbid intellectual disability. Why would the severity of one disorder be defined solely by the existence of another disorder?
  • Mild autism means the person meets fewer criteria. Relatively speaking, then, again, Asperger’s can be considered to be milder than autistic disorder, because for an Asperger’s diagnosis, you need to meet only three criteria (out of eight), whereas you need six (out of twelve) for an autism diagnosis. I could be considered to have moderate Asperger’s, because I meet five criteria (as I walk myself through the DSM-IV-TR right now, I forgot how many I met during my diagnostic interview). However, most people with an Asperger’s diagnosis will in fact meet some criteria from the “communication” set that isn’t included with their diagnosis, but less obviously than those with an autistic disorder label (I for one have periods when I use a lot of repetitive language, but am generally judged to have normal communication). Also, some people experience more trouble due to one area of impairment (eg. repetitive behaviors) than another, and may therefore meet fewer criteria but still be equally severely impaired. And, of course, I’m not even speaking about those autism symptoms that haven’t made it into the DSM-IV, like sensory processing differences, executive dysfunction, etc. I for one find these particularly impairing.
  • Mild autism means few behavioral problems, like aggression or self-injury. Even though this is often assumed to be a logical determiner of severity, these problems aren’t anywhere in the DSM-IV-TR or DSM-5 as far as I know. I got this one thrown at my by my therapist and social worker. They don’t realize that I’m heavily medicated and that, besides, my aggression/self-injurious behavior is considered a symptom of my borderline personality disorder.
  • Mild autism means the person can live independently, keep a job, etc. This may in fact be the most accurate determiner of functioning, and it has made it into the DSM-IV-TR as one’s axis V GAF (global assessment of functioning) score. The problem with this very raw guess about one’s ability to function in daily life, is that of course someone may function alright in one area and not function at all in another. For example, I am at this point unemployable for reasons related to my autism (of course I am unemployable for reasons related to my lack of education, too, but that is not the point) and cannot live independently, but I can be in a romantic relationship.
  • Mild autism smeans needing little structure: this has made it into DSM-5 as the repetitive behavior severity determiner. I got this thrown at me yesterday by the nurse saying I didn’t need ltos of structure. This may be so, in that I do not attend day activities nine-to-five, but this is mostly because I have such severe sensory and cognitive overload issues that I cannot function in a group for any extended period of time. I also avoid needing support a lot by for example staying in bed all day.

  • Mild auism means being able to hold a conversation. This is in DSM-5 as the social communicative impairments determiner of severity. I can hold an okay one-on-one conversation, but then again, I’m passive, not active-but-odd.

I do realize that I’m not severely autistic by many of these determinants. This, a gain, however, does not mean needing little support. In fact, on a busy ward like mine, it is required that you actively ask for support when yo need it. That is particularly hard for me, so I’m told I a pretty self-reliant. This inability to ask for support has led to a few pretty awkward situations lately. For example, yesterday night, I couldn’t sleep, but when going to the night staff, I was met with: “So what can I do for yu?” Well, I didn’t know, so I went back to my room and was up all night. When, a few hours later, I was feeling very much on edge, I self-harmed to calm myself because I knew that I didn’t know what else to do and I knew the staff wasn’t going to help me anyway. I haven’t told the staff about my self-harm, because I reckon they’ll chalk it up to BPD-related attention-seeking if I do.

What Is a Sensory Diet?

Sensory processig disorder (SPD) refers to a group of disorders that cause problems regulating and processing sensory input. Sensory issues can also be prevalent in autistic individuals. I for one have strong sensry needs, and have lately considered creating my own sensory diet.

What is a sensory diet? It involves all sensory input we deliberately create to meet a person’s sensory needs. I reckon it can also be sensory input we remove, because some people actually get overloaded by certain stimuli. In sensory integration dysfunction, a particular type of SPD, people roughly fall into two types or a combination of both: sensory seeking and sensory avoidant. I for one avoid certain stimuli and crave others, which both can be addressed in a sensory diet.

Here are some examples of sensory activities and input you can use in a sensory diet:


  • Fidgeting. This is perhaps the easiest to incorporate, as anyone can be fidgeting. It may be necessary to teach yourself or the sensory person in your life to fidget in a non-obvious way as to minimize social stigma. Then again, consider also educating the people aroudn the sensory person about toleracnce of varying sensory needs.

  • Weighted blankets or vests. I have not found a weighted blanket in the Netherlands, but honestly have not been looing yet. A weighted blanket, as the term says, is a blanket with extra weight added to it to provide deep pressure. Even people who may be sensory avoidant towards the slightest stimuli, may like this. A weighted vest should not be worn all day. I don’t know about a weighted blanket for sleep.

  • Play dough or clay. Use play dough for a younger child and perhaps some type of clay for an older child or adult. I prefer polymer clay to earth clay because it gets less messy.

  • Swinging, jumping, running, exercise. This seems more appropriate for a child, but then again sensory needs don’t cease to exist when a child grows up. Adults might like to swing too. As an alternative if no swings are available, consider certain types of exercise.


These are all activities for the sensory seeker. For the sensory avoidant person, you may need to eliminate certain stimuli. For example, a person might want to choose dim lighting in their house (I realize this is not an option in schools or public places). There are lamps that shine upward to provide a more even lighting experience.

Most SPD people have trouble integrating multiple stimuli. Avoid having the radio or TV on when talking to them for this reason. It may seem like an inconvenience, but please realize most SPD people are already overwhelmed by the lighting in a room and ordinary sunds that cannot be eliminated. Note please that thoughtless exposure may ultimately teach a sensory person to avoid meltdown, but will not get them to avoid overload.

Thoughts on Autism and Behavior Modification

As I said yesterday, autism sucks sometiems. This doesn’t mean it needs to be eradicated. Then again, not eradicating it doesn’t mean not pursuing treatment for its bothersome symptoms. I would pursue treatment for certain symptoms even in an ideal society. For example, I take medication for irritability and anxiety and see no reason not to.

Where it gets trickier is when I’m forced by circumstances to pursue treatment, and others dictate what kind of treatment I get. I may legally be an adult, but I am not in a position to live without supports, which in essence creates a power dynamic in which my staff largely determine whhih of my symptoms get treated and how. Behavior modification is staff’s favorite treatment modality, and even though originally, behaviorists tended to include the environment in their assessments of behaviors, B-mod has largely gone down to ignoring and/or punishing “negative” behaviors and sometimes rewarding “positive” ones.

I put these two between scare quotes because, what is perceived to be a positive or negative behavior, is not always (or rather, is rarely) objective, and even when a behavior is by most perceived to be positive or negative, the way it’s handled may still vary depending on people’s perceptions of what is behind said behavior (which, I might say, the original behaviorists didn’t care about). For example, as long as I’m not acting out aggressively towards others (which icnludes mild verbal aggression), I can exhibit as much self-directed violence as I need to. I assume the idea behind this is that I’m borderline and borderlines need to be responsible for their own behavior and its consequences. I’ve had people seemingly more annoyed at the fact that they had to take care of my physcal wounds than concerned at the fact that I’d inflicted them.

Now we’ve moved past the times when cognitions, emotions etc. didn’t exist. Lay behaviorists (ie. most staff) have taken just what they want out of behaviorism. I remember in 2008 my diagnosing psychologist recommended a functional bheavioral assessment on my meltdowns. This includes close observation of behavior, antecedents and consequences, in order to hopefully find the stimuli that trigger the aggressive response. Now I’ve not yet figured out what I think of this, but I never got to, since such an assessment never took place. The staff introduced seclusion, used it as a threat when I became even slightly irritable, noticed that made my behaviors decrease and decided this was the cure.

Now let me tell you: autistics have as much emotion, cognition and sensation as neurotypicals, we just experience it differently. If you wouldn’t want to be subjected to harsh behaviorism yourself, then don’t subject an autistic to it. If you want to eradicate a behavior, observe its situational context closely and consider how you would respond in this situation. Is the autistic perhaps trying to communicate the same that you would in this situation, only using a different modality? Are they perhaps responding to sensory overload the same you would, only experiencing this overload differently than you would? If so, consider meeting the autistic’s needs beofre you attempt to modify their hehavior. If you want to modify their behavior anyway, consider whether you would want your preferred B-mod method used on yourself. I think everyone who has the power to seclude, restrain or tranquillize another person, needs to have expierenced it themselves first. Lastly, don’t assume that just because the autistic isn’t displaying behavior that annoys you, it means that they’re coping fine.

Autistic Processing Difference vs. Cognitive Distortion

Today, I experienced a combination of emotional turmoil and sensory overload. Which came first is hard to tell, as I was having oversensitivities already for an hour or so, but the actual reaction, which is either a meltdown or an emotional breakdown, was caused by frustration. Given that both autism and borderline personality disorder come with distress tolerance issues, it is hard knowing which is to blame. It doesn’t really matter, except that the two require different approaches. BPD treatment involves skills training in distress tolerance, learning to shift your idea that you can’t handle frustration to the idea that you prefer not to get furstrated. Autistic distress tolerance issues involve an increased need for routine and time to adapt to a sudden change in that routine.

When sensory overreactivity comes into the equation, it gets more complicated. If this is assumed to be an emotion regulation or distress tolerance issue, people need to learn to accept that sometimes there’s noise they don’t like. When people still didn’t acknowledge my autism, I was often told that it’s other people’s right to make noise, as if I was depriving them of that right with my reaction to overload. In autism, however, noise can be painful, and the right approach is to allow the autistic quiet time away from the overloading stimuli.

Now that I write this, I notice that I’m connoting that the treatment I assuem is perceived to be right tfor BPD is really not that right at all. In fact, I believe that you cannot assume that a problem with distress tolerance is ever true unwillingness to accept that things can’t happen on your terms all the time, which is what is assumed in personality disorders. There are some people who are truly unwilling to take others’ feelings into account, but this si much rarer than the assumption that people are unwilling to take others’ feelings into account. I realize that cognitive distortions are not necessarily willful, and that the thought that you can’t handle any frustration is not the same as the thought that the world revolves around your need for gratification. What I mean to say, however, is that most people, and especially autistic or otherwise neurodiverse people, do not just think they have difficulties. We genuinely do process stimuli differently, and this means that “can’t” is not just a cognitive distortion most of the time. That doesn’t mean that autistics doon’t have cognitive distortions, too. What it means is that you need to take into account autistics’ genuinely different processing style when assessing or treating cognitive distortions. As I was being told for the umpteenth time that my daily living skills deficits are largely due to fear of failure, I begun to wonder whether NTs can truly evr make such a judgment.

The Attention-Seeking Theory of BPD

There is lots of stigma surrouding mental illness. Borderline personality disorder is no exception. In fact, it is among the more stigmatized illnesses. Particularly, people believe borderlines act out to gain attention, while there’s evidence they do it out of a need to regulate emotions.

I am very thankful that I didn’t have the BPD diagnosis when I was first hospitalized in 2007. I had done something that can with good reason be seen as attention-seeking – made a suicidal threat in public -, but I was realy not thinking of the attention I’d get with this. Besides, the kind of attention I got, did matter quite a bit. It is not purely for attention, even though my threat had a signaling function.

In like 2006, before any mental condition had been diagnosed, I was talking to my named support worker at an idependence training facility about my recurrent meltdowns. At one point she concluded that I did it for attention. “So we won’t give you attention anymore. Don’t think you can do this for attention.” In reality, the majority of my meltdowns and acting-out behaviors have the function of either regulating emotions or overwhelming stimuli.

Another thing with the attention-seeking theory is that nothing really is wrong with attention-seeking. Of course, having a meltdown for attention is not appropriate, but it is not like ignoring the person is going to make them better. It will just lead to them giving up and developing learned helplessness. Rather, professionals and others need to help the borderline by providing the right kind of attention before behavior escalates. I strongly disagree with the ida that borderlines need to be left to solve their own problems. We lack skills in emotion regulation, and need to actually be taught these skills. When other conditions, like autism, come into the equation, it gets more complicated, because we truly do not have the ability to process ordinaryy stimuli. I, for one, have a hard time communicating when overwhelmed, so I can’t get across my needs in an appropriate manner. It is further reinforcing learned helplnessness to just ignore me in such a state.

Autism and Justified Anger

On my autism treatment and acceptance, Autisticook commented by saying that anger in an autistic is often justified. She compared it to the situation where a wheelchiar user gets angry because they are faced with yet another two-step staircase that wasn’t necessary and where nobody thought of installing a ramp. This made me think: are we overpathologizing anger in people with developmental disabilities (and mental illness)? Are we incorrectly assuming that anger is part of the disorder, while it’s just a response to a lack of accommodations? This is obviously not a scientific discussion, as what is a reasonable accommodation depends on your perspective.

I just a few days ago heard about cognitive accessibility, where people accommodate their language, for exxample, for understanding by people with learning difficulties. I’m trying to find an accessible and understandable explanation of this, but can’t seem to find one. What I understan dit to mean, includes for example using simple, straightfoward language. With autistic people, you may need to refrain from using figures of speech, for example.

What if you were dropped in a country where you didn’t speak the language and everyone refused to speak English? Would you get angry? Quite likely you would. Now understand autism as communicating in a different language, too. Is it strange then that the autistic gets angry when you routinely refuse to make an effort to speak their language?

Autism is not just a communication disability. It’s in a way a sensory disability, too. Imagine, again, being in that foreign country and everyone shouting at you for whatever reason. They also randomly shine a flashlight at your eyes for whatever reason. In addition, this country is rich on insects, and they crawl over your body all the time. Would you get frustrated? Sure you would!

We do not medicate wheelchair users for getting frustrated at the umpteenth staircase. You would not want to be put on medication if you were in the aforementioed country. So why do we medicate autistics who are irritable? It’s probably because accommodating them requires a radical paradigm shift in what we always thought access was all about. Is it a more radical shift than the shift towards wheelchiar accessibility? I am not sure.