Tag Archives: Second Opinion

My Diagnostic Rollercoaster Ride #BADD2017

Today is Blogging Against Disablism Day. It would also have been my discharge date from the mental institution. Unfortunately, virtually no after care has been arranged yet. This didn’t keep my psychologist from determining I could leave today, even despite my husband sending her an E-mail voicing his disapproval on Tuesday. I had my “exit meeting” on Wednesday. In this meeting, my psychologist explained that every other time, she and the social worker can get after care arranged within a month, so if we couldn’t get it arranged within three months for me, that was my fault. Apparently, they’d handed me the responsibility of arranging for my own after care, only without telling me. The patient advocate couldn’t do anything, because I’d have my first appointment with community mental health on Friday and that was all my psychologist was legally required to do in the way of after care. I called my mother-in-law in a panic. She convinced my psychologist to give me one more week in the institution. My definitive discharge date is May 8.

Today I also had my conclusive appointment for the independent second opinion/re-assessment I requested regarding my diagnosis. I haven’t yet seen the report, as the psychologist has yet to finish that, but she did tell me her conclusions. I am happy to share that I got my autism diagnosis back!

It’s pretty unreal. I feel the same way I felt when I was first told I had been diagnosed with dependent personality disorder. Only this time the dreamy state I’m thinking I’ll awaken from any moment, isn’t a nightmare. That’s not to say the psychologist’s opinions are all fluff. In fact, though she didn’t say this, it may be the psychologist agrees with my DPD diagnosis. Not that I care much, since the recommendations she made for reinforcing my independence were pretty good. Besides, by now I’ve been used to being seen as one little piece of learned helplessness. I guess that’s a form of learned helplessness itself.

It’s been one awful rollercoaster ride this past year or so. It started in late June of 2016, when my psychologist pulled me out of day activities to casually inform me she had changed my descriptive diagnosis. Since the Dutch health system is built around diagnosis-treatment combinations, I worried some. However, your DSM-IV (we still use DSM-IV here) classification, not your descriptive diagnosis, determines what care you can get, and my psychologist hadn’t said she’d changed my DSM-IV classification. She had, but I didn’t find out about that till more than a month later.

I remember vividly that same day telling a day activities staff at a place I wanted to do day activities at once discharged, that I was stuck in diagnotic limbo. Interestingly, I made an appointment for a formal intake interview just an hour before my appointment with the independent psychologist.

Then came the process of applying for an independent second opinion. I faced a lot of hostility during this process and I don’t just mean from my psychologist. I mean, my psychologist tried to keep the peace and calm by negotiating a diagnosis we both could live with. In hindsight, that’s the strangest agreement I’ve ever come to. However, the worst hostility came from within the Dutch autistic community. I was a member of a Dutch forum, where apparently you had to have an official diagnosis or be in the process of obtainng one to get in. Once I posted about my psychologist removing my autis diagnosis, my psychologist was treated like the ultimate autority on my diagnosis and the person who finally unmasked my manipulative nature. When I said I had been diagnosed autistic three times before, this was used against me. After all, how many second or third or fourth or fifth opinions do I get?

By early December, when I was denied access to said autism forum for good, I started taking into account the possibility that the independent assessor agreed I’m not autistic. I never fully got that into my system and that was what kept me going: I still had hope that my self-image wouldn’t be shattered to pieces. That I wouldn’t have to nearly drown for the rest of my life because my every support need is just dependency.

During January till mid-April, I sank to the lowest point I’ve been at for a long time. I was depressed and suiciidal and making plans for a final step. Because this was when my assessment took place, the psychologist believes I have depression. I clarified today that, while I’m always slightly depressed, it isn’t at clinical levels most of the time.

I am so glad the outcome of my assessment is as it is. Now I still need my new community treatment team to take into account this diagnosis. I’d rather not endure another rollercoaster ride like this.

First Appointment for My Second Opinion

Like I said on Tuesday, I had my first appointment for the independent second opinion I requested regarding my diagnosis yesterday. I had chosen to be referred to my province’s university hospital, where the psychiatry department has expertise on autism as well as personality disorders. I after all wanted them not to be too prejudiced for or against an autism diagnosis for me. I mean, I have had autism diagnosed previously and think I have this, but there must be a reason my treating psychologist doesn’t agree. The most important reason for this is her believing that, because I developed hydrocephalus as a baby, my diagnosis should be some form of unspecified brain injury. Since this isn’t in the diagnostic handbooks, I’m now left with “just” a personality disorder, a diagnosis I dispute.

I had a two-hour meeting with a clinical neuropsychologist and a medical psychology intern. Because I had somehow seemed to remember the appointment would take only 30 minutes, this was quite a change of game to me. I however handled it well and was in fact glad that I could explain things. I had thought they’d just rely on the questionnaires I’d filled out last week, which couldn’t possibly give them a complete picture.

First, the neuropsych said I’d come to the right place, as this psychiatry dept know brain injury, autism as well as personality disorders. I said I knew and that I’d requested to be referred here myself. She then asked me to explain my impairments. I focused on sensory and organizational skills difficulties, as my social impairments are not too obvious in my current setting. I mean, I’ve heard nurses say I can’t possibly be autistic because I can hold down a normal-sounding conversation with them. I can, but then again conversations like this aren’t meant to be truly reciprocal. I instead gave examples of sensory difficulties and problems with daily activities.

Then we went over my struggles and strengths throughout life. I started by recounting my elementary school experiences. I realized I remembered social isolation from as early as Kindergarten on. I also mentioned I remembered feeling practically burned out by age five, insofar as a five-year-old can have this experience. I forgot to mention that my parents have always said I was a cheerful preschooler at least and didn’t start having serious trouble until I had to learn Braille by age seven, presumably because I didn’t accept my blindness. I did however explain my difficulties in accepting my blindness. I explained that I temporarily accepted my blindness, or at least pretended I did, when I went to regular school at age thirteen, but never truly accepted it.

I mentioned having some friends in first to third grade, mostly older girls who babied me. I did have one friend in later elementary school too, but did experience more social isolation and trouble navigating the more complex friending process from age nine on. At this point, my behavior problems also became worse. I mentioned screaming, self-harm and physical aggression, though I only know I was physically aggressive because my mother reported it to my diagnostician in 2007. I also mentioned being good at academics. The psychologists asked about my interests. I mentioned drawing maps and calendar calculation. She didn’t ask about play, which was one area in which I was okay if behind. I mean, I still played with dolls by age twelve, but that may be considered a strength in the realm of autism, as it shows imagination.

My parents encouraged me to develop age-appropriate intersts when I was about ten. Looking back, I don’t think they knew what my peers were into either. I told the psychologist about the Backstreet Boys poster on my wall, that I only had for the purpose of fitting in. Another example that I only remember just now is my pretending to be an Ajax fan. Ajax is a major Dutch football club from Amsterdam. I am originally from Rotterdam, which has its own major football club whose fans hate Ajax, but I went to school in another city, so all my peers were Ajax fans.

When I was thirteen, I transitioned from special education to a mainstream secondary school. I mentioned feeling extreme stress then, being bullied and isolated. I did mention the four girls I was “friends” with for a few months in my first year at this school, explaining that I was way too open and clingy to them and pushed them away. I also mentioned clinging to my sister’s friends’ big sisters in later elementary school. I mentioned seeing friends in a more materialistic way than most older children see their friends. I mean, when one girl in late elementary school gave her friends candy, I believed I was her friend when she gave me candy too. I even imitated her friends by asking this girl, in the same tone of voice as they did, “Got something to chew on?”

I didn’t go into that much detail about my secondary school struggles. Honestly, I barely remember this time period, even though I kept a diary throughout secondary school. I did mention feeling like I was out of my own body or living in a movie throughout adolescence. I am surprised as I write about and recall my meeting that I barely used technical terms. I consider this a good thing.

I went on to describe my increasing struggles with self-harm and aggression after high school. I described my crisis of 2007. I didn’t go into that much detail regarding my psychiatric hospital years. I did mention some of my current struggles, like with handling unexpected situations. The psychologist asked about my challenging behavior, such as wandering, self-harm and aggression. I said it’s a lot less frequent now that I’m on medication but still happens. The psychologist wants to speak to my psychologist at the institution regarding psychological treatments for these behaviors. I haven’t had any and have never had the impression that my psychologist feels any would be helpful. This got the neuropsychologist to say she may also write some reccommendations for treatment into her report.

At the end, she concluded she does see signs of autism, but wants my parents (likely my father) and husband to fill out some questionnaires too. I will also get a bunch of questionnaires. Since they are in print only, I said I’d need help filling them out. The psychologist offered to have the intern help me, as I would not feel truly free to be honest to my nursing staff or even my husband. I liked that. She also said she wants me to get some neuropsychological testing done to provide further validation for my strengths and weaknesses. I said my psychologist had not felt this would be possible or even necessary. Some tests may not be possible but others are and this psychologist does feel it’d be helpful.

I also got a bunch of questions regarding depressive symptoms. The psychologist at one point pulled out what sounded like the DSM criteria for major depressive disorder. She didn’t finish questioning me on them, as she drifted off a bit.

I had to have bloodwork done to rule out physical causes of psychiatric symptoms. The intern took me to the waiting room, where my sister-in-law was waiting. She came to me, but I didn’t recognize her and the intern had not seen her before, so she assumed my sister-in-law was the nurse for the blood draw. As she lead me out of the psychiatry department, I remembeed to ask who she was and to say I needed to have bloodwork done. We returned and a real nurse came to do the blood draw. I am extremely hard to draw blood from, so the nurse tried three times, then called a colleague. After he drew blood, he asked whether this had been an intake interview. Since that’s what it’s called, I said “Yes”. This meant I had to have my blood pressure (pretty high), temperature, weight and height (I’m still obese) and waist and hip measurements taken. I forgot to say I’m not going for treatment here, which seemed to be the reason the nurse wanted these numbers. I had not grown in abdominal measurements since they were last taken last year, thank goodness.

Overall, I’m pretty happy with the way this appointment has gone. I will get a letter setting a date for an appointment for the questionnaires and tests.

Spectrum Sunday
Keep Calm and Carry On Linking Sunday

If I’m Not Autistic, What Am I?

My psychologist removed my autism diagnosis, which I’d been first given in 2007, last summer. After a long process of negotiations, she decided to diagnose me with dependent personality disorder, borderline personality disorder traits and depressive disorder NOS. I strongly disagree particularly with the DPD label, but more importantly, I want my autism diagnosis back. I requested an independent second opinion, which I’ll be getting the first appointment for this Thursday. Just this evening, I told a leader of an autism group in the Netherlands that I’d be closing the autism chapter if the second opinion provider agreed i’m not autistic after all. Then I’d definitively consider myself, well, what? I’ve rarely used the word “allistic”, which is someone who isn’t autistic. I feel that all people with neurodevelopmental conditions essentially fall on the same spectrum. Many autistics disagree and would not allow, say, a person with ADHD into their community. Indeed, if I’m not autistic, I’m allistic, period.

There used to be some concept of “cousins” in the autistic community, which included people with other neurological or neurodevelopmental differences, such as ADHD, Tourette Syndrome or hydrocephalus. Maybe I could consider myself a “cousin”, since I was at one point diagnosed with hydrocephalus and that’s a far more hard-wired diagnosis than is autism. So I’d be an allistic cousin to the autistic comunity. The concept of “cousins”, however, is barely accepted anymore.

Besides, it’s not just about community. It’s about identity. If I’m told that after all I’m not autistic, a vital part of my identity is being destroyed. Someone compared it to losing their status as an animal lover. It’s far worse. It’s like being told I’m not blind – there is another reason I’m unable to see, but that’s not called blindness. Besides, there’s no ICD-10 or ICD-11 or where are we these days code for it. This is analogous to what my psychologist has done with respect to my autism: it isn’t there, because there is another reason I have cognitive and sensory and social-communicative difficulties, but there’s no DSM-IV code for that.

It affects services, too. If I lost my status as a blind person, I would no longer be allowed to use my white cane. I would no longer be provided with reading materials in accessible formats. I would no longer have access to services for the blind. If there’s no ICD-whatever code for explaining my lack of sight, there won’t be any other way to gain access to these accommodations or supports. I can imagine this is in part the reality for people with conversion disorder manifesting as blindness, since some service and accessible reading material providers ask for verification of the “physical basis” of one’s blindness.

If I lose my status as an autistic person and there’s no diagnosis to replace it with, I’ll not be able to access services that take into account my cognitive, sensory and social-communicative difficulties. In fact, my psychologist has already voiced her disagreement with me applying for day activities for people with traumatic or acquired brain injury. She says I have “congenital brain injury”. At least, that was her reason for removing my autism diagnosis. Since “congenital brain injury” isn’t acquired or traumatic brain injury, I won’t qualify for services for that. Since in fact “congenital brain injury” does not exist in the diagnostic handbooks, there is no help for it. It’s worse even than conversion blindness, since that can be treated somehow.

Now imagine that I, who clealry has an eye condition causing blindness, were told I had conversion blindness for lack of a better diagnosis. That’s about what it feels like being diagnosed with dependent personality disorder as a clearly neurodivergent person.

It could be worse. I could be told I’m not neurodivergent at all. This would go beyond saying I am an unfortunate case of falling between the cracks with my useless diagnosis of “congenital brain injury”. To use the blindness analogy again, this’d be like being told I am fully sighted, yet only believe I’m blind for attention, because I don’t accept my status as a short person, or whatever nonsense claim people have made as to why I erroneously believe I’m neurodivergent. This is a possible outcome of my second opinion too. After all, though I have hydrocephalus, there is no proof as per a neuropsychological evaluation that this has caused me lasting impairments. My psychologist is of this opinion to an extent and so are my parents and sister, believing I have problems because I think I do.

Back to my autism diagnosis or the lack thereof. Some people say you’re autstic if you’re autistic no matter how many professionals say you are not. They say that, if support tailored to autistics, including being part of the autistic community, works, you must be autistic. With my poor self-image, I’m not so sure this would be the case for me.