Tag Archives: Movement Therapy

What I’ve Been Up To Lately

I’ve been meaning to write a lot lately, but I didn’t. All that I started on were random ramblings that I didn’t finish. Today, I’m writing down these random ramblings in a kind of list, in hopes of finally finishing this post.

First, I had movement therpay on Tuesday. It was good in some ways but not good in a sense too. I dissociated a lot. Like the last time I had movement therapy, a part of me came out. This is good, in that it allowed me to express myself in a way I otherwise can’t. However, since my parts are not fully accepted by my mental health team, I’m not sure whether I’ll be taken out of movement therapy for it “not helping”.

Second, on Tuesday evening, my mother sent me and my sister a text message that she and my father were at my paternal grandma’s. She is being kept asleep for pain control and will soon die. This is terribly sad. I mean, yes, she’s 94 and in a lot of pain in addition to having long suffered significant cognitive decline. However, I cherish my grandma greatly. She was an official witness at my wedding in 2011. This was in th eearly stages of her cognitive decline, when she was still just able enough to fulfill this role. I am so glad I had her for this role, as I didn’t have the greatest relationship with my parents or sister at the time, so didn’t want to ask them.

Third, I started at yet another increased dose of citalopram last Monday. I told my psychiatrist on Friday what I’d written down here and she concluded that the medication is helping some but not enough, so she increased it to 40mg a day.

Fourth, yesterday I reached the recomended daily step goal of 10,000 steps despite the hot weather. This is only the second time since I bought my Fitbit activity tracker last February.

Fifth, I’ve been reading some good books lately. I finally finshed Angels with Dirty Faces by Casey Watson, a collection of five previously published mini eBooks. I may post a review soon. On Tuesday, I bought my first Kindle eBook. I wasn’t 100% sure whether it’d work with my screen reader, since it wasn’t mentioned explicitly that it would, but it did. It’s What Every Autistic Girl Wishes Her Parents Knew by the Autism Women’s Network. So far, I’m really enjoying this book.

M – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

Welcome to the letter M post in my #AtoZChallenge on mental health. We’re finally halfway through the challenge. It’s proving pretty hard for me. Particularly, I’m finding it hard to comment on others’ posts regulalry. Sorry about that. This letter was an easy one.

Medication

Medications are usually believed to be an essential part of treatment for severely mentally ill people. The most common psychiatric medications used are antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers and benzodiazepines. I will discuss benzodiazepines separately.

Practically everyone on a long-term inpatient unit takes an antipsychotic. It seems every psychiatrist has their favorite medication of first chooice, though a large number of patients take clozapine. This is not the antipsychotic of first choice, since it can cause potentially fatal side effects, but many people on long-term units are treatment-resistant. Other well-known antipsychotics are aripiprazole (Abilify), risperidone (Risperdal), olanzapine (Zyprexa) and quetiapine (Seroquel).

Commonly-used antidepressants include fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), paroxetine (Paxil) and citalopram (Celexa). These belong to the newer class of antidepressants, called SSRIs. Venlafaxine (Efexor) is an example of an even newer class, called SNRIs. It isn’t as commonly used though. (Efexor in partiuclar was heavily promoted by big pharma in like 2008 but it seems it’s not the wonder drug originally thought.) When people have treatment-resistant depression, they may get older antidepressants (tricyclics of MAOIs) or an antipsychotic (particularly Abilify) may be added. Mood stabilizers are primarily for people with bipolar disorder. Lithium is th most well-knwon mood stabilizer, but anticonvulsants (originally intended for people with epilepsy) are becoming more and more commonly used.

Mindfulness

Mindfulness is one of the recently hyped-up treatments for mental health problems. There are mindfulness workbooks for everything from depression to bulimia to obsessive-compulsive disorder. Mindfulness can be a great part of psychotherapy, but of course it isn’t for everyone.

Movement Therapy

Movement therapy utilizes exercise, yoga or other movement-based techniques in the treatment of mental illness. Exercise can alleviate depression and anxiety. Relaxation techniques are also used in movement therapy. Often, a movement therapy session consists of first doing an exercise and then talking it through with the therapist. Movement therapy can be done both in group and individual settings. I have experience with both and it’s been a help in channeling my irritability..

Music Therapy

Like movement therapy, music therapy is a form of non-verbal therapy for mental illness. I have never had music therapy, because it wasn’t offered at my old institution, and I get the impression that most people here use it to learn to play an instrument. For some though, merely listening to music can be healing and may be part of music therapy.

My Experience With Therapy and Counseling #Write31Days

31 Days of Mental Health

Welcome to day 23 in the #Write31Days challenge on mental health. Today, I’ll focus on another question in the 30-day mental illness awareness challenge. For day 23, the topic is your opinion on therapy. I will share my experiences of therapy and my opinion on various approaches. I have decided to include both traditional psychotherapy approaches and non-verbal approaches.

I had my first experience of therapy as a child, when I had four sessions of play therapy. I didn’t like the therapist, didn’t have insight into my problems, and four sessions obviously wasn’t enough to garner any results. In hindsight, my play behavior did show my problems with rigid thinking, emotion regulation and behavioral control. For example, I’d throw out the dollhouse dolls with purple hair because “people don’t have purple hair”. I also preferred to play with toys that allowed me to show anger, such as toy guns. One vivid memory I have is of me trying to overflow the water tray. The therapist did show me why it wouldn’t work, but I tried anyway.

My first experience with verbal therapy was when I was nineteen and attending the rehabilitation center for the blind. Once again, I didn’t like the therapist, who appeared a bit inpatient towards my difficulties adjusting to blindness and misunderstanding of my social ineptitude. She tried to offer practical advice, while I felt I needed to process the rollercoaster ride that my life had become. Of course, time constraints – I had only about twelve sessions -, prevented us from going deeper.

During my first sixteen months in the psychiatric hospital, I didn’t have a psychologist. I did do movement therapy, which helped me greatly to release my emotional tension. It was here that I learned to rate my distress level – I came up with a system myself. Thhat being said, when later people asked me to rate my distress level, I was often stuck. This moveement therapist I had at the acute ward was one of the more helpful therapists I’ve had.

At the resocialization ward, I tried cognitive-behavioral therapy for a bit. It hardly worked, because I and my therapist agreed I had good reason to be anxious. Then, when I was diagnosed with DID and PTSD, the therapist pushed me to try EMDR, but I resisted. I didn’t have that severe PTSD symptoms, after all, and did have quite a bit of trouble with self-regulation and dissociation.

When I moved to my current institution, I got diagnosed with BPD. My therapist’s expertise was schema-focused therapy, an approach I’d wanted to use for a while. Unfortunately, it didn’t work out. The therapist told one of my parts, who hides her inner weakness behind a stubborn attitude, that she’s a “punitive parent” and needs to disappear. I strongly feel that each part of my personality has a function, so this dismissive attitude didn’t fit me well. Besides, though I learned some from the book the therapist recommended, most of the information was just a bit too abstract.

This therapist left in 2014 and I’ve had a new psychologist for a little over a year now. With her, I focus on supportive counseling and rehabilitation. I find this is most constructive. I do hope that, in the future, I can get some formal psychotherapy again. I have a dialectical behavior therapy self-help book, which is quite interesting. Then again, I find it hard to make a long-term commitment to sticking to one thing to focus on. That is probably the main thing keeping me from engaging properly in psychotherapy.