Tag Archives: Mental Health

Considering Getting a Psychiatrist’s Appointment on My Depressed Mood

Tomorrow, I have an appointment with my community psychiatric nurse (CPN). Part of our appointment will likely be about where to go from here regarding day activities. My CPN already E-mailed me that she’d contacted the Center for Consultation and Expertise. They will hopefully take on my case and help me and my staff assess my needs. That will hopefully help us find a new place or get me the right support at my current place.

I also intend to ask her to get me an appointment with my psychiatrist. I feel too embarrassed to schedule one through the secretary. It’s been 3 1/2 months since my last appointment, so in that sense I could request one just for a catch-up. However, I want to discuss something specific with the psychiatrist and I feel incredibly ashamed of it. I’m finally coming to the conclusion that my depression symptoms are getting worse and to a point where I don’t know how to handle them anymore.

I was more or less by chance diagnosed with major depression last year. This came to light when I had my autism-related independent assessment. I had to fill out a screening tool for depression as part of the intake procedure. I scored as severe on that one. I was then evaluated further and was diagnosed with recurrent moderate depression. Because this was an independent assessment, my psychiatrist isn’t affiliated with this hospital and doesn’t need to take over the diagnosis. I don’t know whether she has.

I do take an antidepressant and have since 2010. Same medication, same dose all these years with no med review whatsoever. I don’t even know for sure why I was put on this medication, except that my Abilify (an antipsychotic) had been increased twice in a few months and I was still irritable.

This is the main reason I feel embarrassed about asking my psychiatrist to evaluate my mood. I mean, irritability bothers other people and ttat’s always been the main reason I was in care. Like, in 2007, when I was admitted to the mental hospital, it was really because of suicidal ideation but my staff always said it was because I’d been having public meltdowns.

I don’t know whether I truly believe that psychiatry’s job is to keep people, or me specifically, from being a pain in other people’s asses. I don’t think it should be. However, I’m rather afraid that my psychiatrist thinks so at least in my case. I’m not exactly sure why, as so far she’s been pretty understanding. I guess they may be left over feelings from all these years being treated like a cumbersome waste of resources.

Keep Calm and Carry On Linking Sunday

Day Activities: Why Do I Seem to Have High Support Needs?

Yesterday, I had a meeting with my day activities and home support staff, my comunity psychiatric nurse (CPN) and the social consultant (local authority person who decides on care funding) in charge of my case. My mother-in-law also attended. The reason for the meeting was my trouble functioning at day activities.

I go to a day center for people with intellectual disabilities and attend a group within the center for people with severe intellectual and multiple disabilities. I don’t have an intellectual disability, but did seem to do best at this sensory-based group up until recently. Then, three new service users joined us, leading to increasing stimulation, stress and staff workloads. I was increasingly overloaded and irritable, which led to the staff cutting my hours because they couldn’t deal with me on top of the other high-support service users for a full day.

The problem is there’s no clear-cut diagnosis to back up why I function best at a low-stress, sensory-based, high-support group. I mean, yeah, I’m blind, but most people who are blind can work regular jobs. Yeah, I’m autistic, but only diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder level 1 (ie. “high-functioning” autism or Asperger’s Syndrome). Yeah, I have mild motor impairments, but my doctor doesn’t know or can’t tell me to what extent they’re diagnosable (as mild cerebral palsy or something else). Yeah, I have mental health issues, but no-one has a clue to what extent these affect me and what they’re even diagnosable as.

As a result, some professionals and non-professionals choose to deny I have high support needs and tell me it’s all dependence, manipulation or attention-seeking. I was lucky that, with one of these professionals being my former psychologist who got me in touch with my current day center, the day center staff and management were up until recently more than willing to accomodate me. For instance, I started day activities at the industrial group at this center, but was soon moved to the sensory group despite, like I said, not even having an intellectual disability, let alone a severe one.

Now that I’m even falling apart at this group, I hear different opinions on where to go from here. At one point, my home support coordinator said maybe the gap between myself and the other service users at the sensory group is too wide, so we need to look at a different kind of place, like a sheltered art shop. I disagreed and not just because my art-making skills are mediocre at best. At more “job-like” day activities places like this, there’s usually more pressure and less support. My day activities staff agreed, adding that I’d tried the industrial group already.

My CPN’s coworker suggested a care farm. As much as I love animals, I know I won’t even be able to navigate a farm without a sighted guide, let alone care for the animals without one-on-one. My mother suggested I look for day activities tailored to the blind. These don’t exist in my area. Besides, I could barely function at the leisure groups at the blindess training center I attended in 2005. My mother said I may be able to now, but I think it unlikely. These places expect a level of independence I don’t have. I mean, I’ve seen my partially sighted friend make soap completely independently after being instructed by me just once, while I still need practically hands-on support after many attempts.

I’m on the verge of crying as I write this. I completed grammar school, for goodness’ sake! Granted, I burned out the minute I left, but I did it nonetheless. Why can’t I even function at a group where people with profound intellectual disabilities can? Or am I really one giant dependent, manipulative, attention-seeking waste of resources?

My CPN is going to contact the Center for Consultation an dExpertise on me. In 2010, they were briefly involved in my case. The consultant wrote in her report that she thinks it’s weird that I’m so cognitively capable and yet cannot do simple activities of daily living such as prpearing my own breakfast. She also wrote something in the report about not knowing whether I’m eliciting care. In other words, she couldn’t say whether or not I’m just one giant dependent, manipulative, attention-seeking waste of resources either. Sigh.

First Week of 2018

Oh my Gosh, it’s beginning to get boring: I haven’t written on this blog in almost a month. I want so badly to write more in 2018, but instead of wrting on this blog, I’m writing brief entries in my journal on my phone. I love it, don’t get me wrong, but I love my blog too.

It has been on my mind for a while to start writing in diary style on my blog. Of course, I can’t share everything I can in my private journal here, but I can share some things. I love the personal mental health bloggers who share what it’s like living with mental illness on a day-to-day basis. So for this purpose, I’ve created the “Diary” category on my blog. Feel free to skip these entries if you’re not interested in them, but if you are, I’d love to hear your thoughts. Today, I’m sharing about the first week of 2018, obviously.

The year didn’t start out that well. I was a bit overloaded and stressed out. I was perseverating on finding a good journaling app for my phone, because I badly wanted to start journaling privately again in 2018. I’ve tried a few apps on the computer and a dozen websites, but I can’t find any that work. By 12AM Monday, I said a quick “Happy new year” to my husband and sister-in-law, who was celebrating with us, only to return to my phone again. In the end, I found a great app: Dyrii. Still, judging by how easily I write this post versus my journal entries, I’m finding using Notepad on my computer is still easier than my iPhone.

I had been going to day activities as normal between Christmas and New year’s, so I only had Monday off, but it felt rather strange to return on Tuesday. I had been informed before the holidays that we’d be getting three new clients in my group at day activities in January. For those who don’t know, I go to a sensory-based group for people with severe intellectual and multiple disabilities. All clients except for me need help with their personal care. The reason this group still fits me is that I’m very easily overloaded and prefer the sensory way of learning. We currently have one group of six clients, including me, in the main room and two clients who are very easily overstimulated in the adjacent room. Come January, I and two of the other current clients would move into the adjacent room with these two clients who are already there. As it turned out, that hasn’t happened yet, because the new clients aren’t there yet.

The total group size will grow from eight to eleven. We won’t get extra staff. This was a stressor to me, as was all the talk about the one-on-one for two clients that needs to be well-arranged in order to make this work, as well as the talk about a client needing one-on-one for meals. It was suggested there’d be no more activities but just meals and personal care moments. This suggestion was made on Wednesday, when I was already pretty badly overloaded and stressed out. I tried to calm myself by thinking I could use my computer or phone if I wanted to do something but there’d be no support available. So I retreated into the adjacent room to use my phone, only to be overwhelmed by people yelling in the corridor. This sent me into full-blown meltdown. I mean, if I can’t use the adjacent room without being overwhelmd now, how will I do so once my two fellow clients join me? I know these are the quietest clients, but still.

Looking back, I am lucky that my staff didn’t see the entire event. I banged my head against a wall, which my husband later asked about whether it got me suspended from day activities. I only then realized that it could have. The only part my staff witnessed was me trying to run away and being pretty irritable. My staff took me to the snoezelen (sensory) room and I had to stay there for fifteen miutes. Then she returned and we talked stuff through.

I called my mental health team, which is a kind of team that always has a community psychiatric nurse on call during office hours, as soon as I got home. The on-call CPN advised me to always have a PRN Ativan with me. I used to always have one with me until my last overdose, when my husband took them away. I haven’t needed it since. The on-call CPN also advised me to call the out-of-hours phone number I’d been given last week whenever I need it. I had been hesitant to call them during the new year’s week-end, as I reasoned my husband was home so I should be able to work out things with him. I haven’t needed to call them since speaking to that CPN though. In fact, I’m pretty calm now. Maybe I needed to melt down in order to calm down again.

Succumb

I often feel like I want to succumb. Especially in the weeks after my first overdose last July, and again now, I find a form of peace and comfort in the thought that I could do it again. Note that I don’t want to die and the fact that apparently I could have died, makes these thoughts scary at the same time. I still envision myself coming out of a possible suicide attempt alive each time. It’s really hard to imagine anything else, as, you know, when I’m dead, there’s no longer me, so nothing to imagine for me. I mean, yes, I sometimes imagine what my funeral will be like, but the very fact that I can imagine it, means I’m alive.

I rationally know, these two times that I did something that could’ve cost me my life, that quite frankly there’s nothing positive about this. I mean, at the end of the day, each time, I still returned to my life as it was before my overdose. I didn’t even want to be taken to the psych unit and there was no need for it either.

How different were these events from my major crisis of 2007? At the time, I didn’t even take any actions that could’ve cost me my life – I just threatened suicide. However, I badly wanted, needed even, to escape the life I was in at the time. This was effective, as I went into the mental hospital and didn’t leave institutional life for almost a decade. Now I’m in the community again and it’s proving hard, but I must say, not as hard as I’d expected it to be. If things had gone as I expected them to, I would’ve been in chronic crisis mode. I’m not now. I don’t make any plans to end it all. Not that I did so back then, but I did run away from my home each day for a week before I finally crashed and threatened suicide.

I don’t know what makes my current thoughts that I can, if I want to, take my life any less serious than the thoughts I had back in 2007. After all, I did have these thoughts for several months following my crisis. Still, they feel less serious now. Is it because now, I don’t dramatically over-express them (unless this blog post counts)? Is it because, other than having these thoughts and being in a pretty depressed mood, I still go about my business as usual? Then again, I did most of the things I had to in 2007 too, up to taking an exam at university three days before being hospitalized.

I think honestly, the difference is that, back then, I was over-emotional, whereas now, I am under-emotional. Back then, I experienced and expressed quite intense emotions, whereas now, if anything at all, I feel numb.

I don’t know whether this is better or worse. I have a feeling that it is less serious, as I’m not emotionally dysregulated like I was back then. I don’t go about having public screaming and crying fits. I barely go about expressing myself at all, unless again this blog post counts. I don’t go about making suicide threats to random people. I don’t even know what I want to avoid or achieve anymore. As such, I don’t make any actual suicide plans, but I don’t know whether I care if I died right now either.

This post is linked up with The Daily Post’s prompt for today: sucuumb.

Self-Destructive

So #Write31Days didn’t work out, but not because I couldn’t be motivated to write. The reason was that, on Wednesday, I landed in crisis, took an overdose of medication and had to be taken to the hospital. I spent the night on the internal medicine ward and was medically cleared the following day. However, it took till around 5PM before I could see the consulting psychiatrist. She was a nice woman. I knew her nurse from the other time I’d taken an overdose last July. Nothing much has yet been decided, as the psychiatrist will speak to my CPN on Monday, but I was cleared to go home.

Today, I want to talk about harmful and self-destructive behavior as it happens in various mental disorders. Particularly, I want to relate it to what I assume are my current diagnoses: autism spectrum disorder and borderline personality disorder. Unlike what many people believe, the reasons for harmful behaviors are not either fully due to autism or fully due to BPD.

In autism, self-injury and aggression are common, but are seen as steretypical behaviors. For example, some autistics hit themselves as a form of self-stimulation. However, there is a common behaviorist phrase that says all behavior is communication. As such, autistics often also engage in self-injurious behavior to communicate pain, overload or frustration.

Here is where the lines between autism and BPD become blurry. After all, unlike what is commonly believed, borderlines don’t self-destruct “for attention” or “to manipulate”. Most self-harm to deal with strong emotions that they perceive as overwhelming. Whether these emotions come from within the person themself (as is often the case in BPD) or from external sources of frustration, may seem to be important, but it isn’t. A situation doesn’t make you self-destruct, after all. It’s each person’s choice, within the limits of their mind’s capacity at that particular point.

The reason I took an overdose on Wednesday, isn’t fully clear to me either. I do remember feeling sensorially overloaded with cold. I tried to warm up by going on the elliptical trainer. After all, I needed my exercise too, as I hadn’t worked out all week. I couldn’t find my sneakers or my sports clothes, so I tried for a bit to work out in my regular clohes, except for my vest. I was shivering though and this overloaded me even more. From that point, I don’t rmemeber much. I was feeling rather unreal, though I must’ve had some awareness of what I was doing, as I retrieved medications from various sources. Once the first pill bottle, which was the easiest to find, was down, I didn’t feel there was a way back.

So is this typical borderline behavior? Yes, in that it’s not stereotyped and was rather purposeful. It certainly wasn’t the stereotypical “cry for help” type of BPD behavior though. I didn’t want to call the out-of-hours GP and I had zero interest in being admitted to a mental hospital. I do think I need some more guidance, but not in the sense of somemone providing me emotional nurture.

In the sense of what caused it, it’s more autistic sensory overload and difficulty handling unexpected situations and frustrations. The help I requested when talking to the consulting psychiatrist was of such nature: I need some practical guidance on getting more structure in my day and dealing with unexpected situations. It may be my home support worker could provide this, or I may need my nurse from the assertive community treatment team for this. I also remember just now having discussed with my nurse a prescription phone call. This means that you can call (usually I think a max number of times a week or month) to a psych unit for support if you’re about to go into crisis. I will ask my CPN about this.

Psychiatric Diagnoses I’ve Been Given

I just checked out the “30 days of mental illness awareness” challenge and was inspired to write a timeline of my mental health. Then I realized I already wrote it in 2015. Another question in the 30-day challenge though is what you’re currently diagnosed with. Seriously, I don’t know what exactly my current diagnosis is. I know what the university hospital psychologist diagnosed me with, but I am not sure the psychiatrist at my current community treatment team agrees.

I’ve had a lot of diagnoses in the past. I’ve had even more suggested diagnoses that never made it into my file. Today, I will write a list of the diagnoses I’ve had. I will comment on them too.

1. Autism spectrum disorder. I was first diagnosed with this twice in 2007, then again in 2010. I lost my diagnosis in 2016 and was rediagnosed in 2017. This is the only diagnosis I’m pretty sure of that I agree with 100%. It’s the only diagnosis that I’ve been given through a proper evaluation (several, in fact).

2. Adjustment disorder. This was my diagnosis upon admission to the mental hospital in 2007. I didn’t meet the criteria for depression or any other serious mental health condition but needed care anyway. I was at the time fine with that diagnosis and think the crisis team psychiatrist who made it, did a pretty good job of assessing me.

3. Impulse control disorder NOS. I was never told why I got this diagnosis. I just found it on my treatment plan in May 2008. Probably, it was a replacement for the adjustment disorder, which you can only have for six months once the stressor that caused it goes away. I never agreed with this diagnosis and didn’t really take it all that seriously.

4. Dissociative identity disorder. This was diagnosed in November of 2010 and was probably the most controversial diagnosis I’ve ever had. I wasn’t properly assessed for it and my psychologist at the time took what I told her almost at face value. I never believed deep down that I met the full criteria for this. I mean, yes I do have alters and I do have pretty bad dissociative symptoms sometimes, but amnesia is the exception. I find this terribly hard to admit but I do have to acknowledge this diagnosis was in part based on (self-)suggestion. I do believe, like I said, that I have some dissociative symptoms.

5. Post-traumatic stress disorder. I got this diagnosis together with the DID. I don’t really know why. I mean, yes, I did (and still do) have some symptoms, but I’m not sure I have nough and I never reported more than I actually had. I did get some assessment for this. I do currently believe I definitely do have some PTSD symptoms, particularly complex PTSD symptoms. Then again, there is a lot of overlap with borderline personality disorder traits.

6. Borderline personality disorder. This was diagnosed in 2013 and replaced DID and PTSD. It was later “downgraded” to BPD traits. I do agree I have BPD traits, but I am more the quiet borderline type.

7. Dependent personality disorder. I was given this diagnosis in 2016. Never quite agreed with it, except in the sense that I could be led to believe I had every disorder that was ever suggested to me.

8. Depression. This was diagnosed in 2017 by the university hospital psychologist. I had previously been diagnosed with depressive disorder NOS, but that, according to my psychologist, was only because a diagnosis on axis I (anything other than a personality disorder) is required for treatment. I admit I was pretty badly depressed in the months that I had my assessment at the university hospital, but am not sure it was bad enough for a diagnosis. I mean, I didn’t meet the criteria in 2007, so how could I meet them in 2017? I’m assuming my current psychiatrist removed that diagnosis.

Just One Thing

Last week, I started a journal-style blog to explore my inner world. As usual, I didn’t write in it much at all, so I’m resorting back to this blog. The reason I wanted another blog is because of the derogatory comments I’ve gotten here regarding my dissociation. No, I don’t have a diagnosis of dissociative identity disorder anymore and no, I don’t claim to be DID. I do however have insiders, parts, alters or however you’d like to call them. I don’t care what people think of this, or at least, I try not to care. To reclaim myself and my experience, here I’m sharing a post I wrote last week.

Manyofus1980 from Therapy Bits posed an interesting question: if the world could understand just one thing about your mental health diagnosis, what would it be? In the post title, the question is about your “mental illness” rather than your “diagosis”. This is important to my answer, as my short answer is: my diagnosis does not dictate my experience.

I have had countless diagnoses over the years, some of which I agreed with and some of which I disputed. I don’t even know what my current diagnosis is according to my community treatment team. According to the university hospital where I got a second opinion last spring, it’s autism spectrum disorder, recurrent moderate depression and borderline personality disorder traits. Of this, I doubt the depression, because my default mood is low. Then again, I do seem to remember feeling much lower than low in the months that I had my assessment at this hospital. The thing is, I can’t usually connect my feelings from the past to the present if they’re very different.

We didn’t really go into my trauma experience, as my assessment was primarily focused on autism. However, the university hospital psychologist did recommend I get EMDR treatment for the negative experiences I had in the process of moving towards independence. I have not had a trauma-based diagnosis since 2013 and that’s fine by me. I don’t need a diagnosis to justify my experience.

I am who I am. We are who we are. We don’t fit in a diagnostic box, because, well, we’re we.

Sometimes, we feel upset that we don’t get recognition from our treatment team (as far as we know) for our traumatic and post-traumatic experiences. I had a lot of difficulty answering my psychiatrist’s questions about this during my intake interview. I mean, most of the trauma we endured, didn’t leave visible wounds. I know that dissociation can be caused by attachment issues, sometimes even too mild to create PTSD. However, there is still a common belief that only prolonged sexual or ritual abuse can create alter parts. I try not to care. We are we are we, so deal with it.

When Intense Emotions Take Over My Mind

Okay, this year’s #AtoZChallenge didn’t work out. I knew it would be tough writing about autism and related disorders when myself undergoing re-assessment for autism. It didn’t help that, from the E-mail I received on the day I posted my theme reveal, it became clear that I will not have an answer before the end of April. That wasn’t the reason I haven’t written at all since April 1 though. The real reason was my mental health.

Like I mentioned, I have been rather anxious and depressed lately. It however got extreme over the past two weeks. This likely isn’t a worsening of my depression as much as it is emotional dysregulation. That doesn’t make it less real though.

About two weeks ago, I started being more irritable and having more dark, death-related and suicidal thoughts than I had before. I had had almost-daily dark thoughts for a few months, but now they became more than daily. I also started making more concrete plans for a final step. Before then, there had been bizarre images in my head of how I’d die by crucifying myself over the staircase at home and such. These had appeared a bit laughable even to my twisted mind. Now, I started making plans and the before then bizarre-sounding thoughts didn’t seem that ridiculous anymore.

I wandered out of the house at home last week Saturday. Thankfully, my husband came back from where he’d been within aobut fifteen minutes and I was fine. Then on Sunday I had a very bad argument with my named nurse that ended in me melting down.

On Monday, I decided I’d stop taking my medication. I didn’t take my morning meds other than birth conrol and vitamin D (because I wanted to take birth control and couldn’t tell the two apart) on Tuesday. I spiraled out of control that same afternoon. This, for your information, can’t have been from withdrawal yet.

The reason I quit taking my medication was that I’d been having these dark thoughts for a while already and yet I felt I was too drugged up to express them. I don’t mean that I wanted to tell the world, like I’m doing now, but I wanted to be able to cry. And cry I did. I also felt like maybe, if I stopped taking my meds, I’d feel some kind of motivation again. I take a high dose of an antipsychotic, which admittedly the psychiatrist says can’t cause flat affect. I also take an antidepressant, but I’d forgotten why I’d been prescribed it (in 2010!) and it had never been reviewed.

Admittedly, there was also a part in me that wanted to signal to my staff that I wasn’t coping. That didn’t really work. My psychologist said that, if I wanted to be taken seriously about my mood, I needed to take my meds. Not that she’s ever taken me seriously about my mood, unless writing depression NOS into my diagnosis counts, which I don’t feel it does. She also told me that I sabotage the independent assessment if I don’t take my meds. I don’t like to admit it but that was one reason I started taking them again on Saturday. I hate to admit I give in to authoritarian manipulation, but I do.

on Wednesday, I started experiencing what I believe are brain zaps – a kind of weird dizzy spell caused by antidepressant withdrawal. I at first thought they were a side effect of a failed attempt at an overdose. They weren’t. By Friday, they occurred about every minute. I was then ready to start my antidepressant again, but wasn’t sure I could safely go back on it after five days. The nurses had to ask the on-duty doctor or some kind of head nurse or whoever and I didn’t get an answer till Saturday afternoon. Now I feel so stupid for havng bothered the nurses with this question on a week-end. I am glad for no more brain zaps though. I did also start back on the anitpsychotic. Not because I want to be on it, but because it seems I need to.

Since late Thursday evening, I’ve felt relatively well. I still experience anxiety and depression, but my emotions aren’t as out-of-control as they were before. Some things that helped were one nurse taking me on walks and allowing me to use her boxing equipment to blow off some steam. It sucks that I can’t do this at home.

Anxiety and Depression in Children With and Without Autism #AtoZChallenge

Welcome to day one on the 2017 #AtoZChallenge on neurodevelopmental disorders. I experience a great deal of anxiety around this challenge particularly because, like I said in my theme reveal post, I am currently in the re-assessment process. On the day I published my theme reveal post, I received an E-mail from the clinical neuropsychologist in charge of my second opinion answering questions I had taken to my psychological assessment. One of them concerned depression. I have suffered from depressive symptoms since childhood. I pointed this out, in a way to reassure her that depression is somewhat normal for me and hence she didn’t need to pull out the major depressive disorder criteria. A reaction i did not expect, was that depression presents itself differently in children and for this reason it might be that in fact my challenging behavior was a symptom of childhood-onset depression.

I share this story because, for today, I am focusing on anxiety and depression as they relate to autism. I will start by sharing a bit about how these conditions present themselves in typical children, as it might be I’m not autistic or suffering from any neurodevelopmental condition after all.

Depression and Anxiety in Typical Children

Depression and anxiety are serious conditions that are different from normal sadness or worry. Common symptoms in anyone with depression or anxiety include negative thoughts, excessive worrying, diffculty concentrating, feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness. Particulalrly in youg children, depression and anxiety are however hard to recognize, as they may present differently than they would in older children or adults. For example, depression may show as irritability and anger, withdrawal, vocal outbursts or crying, or physical symptoms such as headaches or stomach problems. Anxiety can also present with physical symptoms or it may show as developmental regression. Some children with anxiety disorders may become clingy, fidget a lot or go to the toilet frequently.

It may be tempting to label a child who displays disruptive behavior, such as irritability, as “naughty”. However, treating behavior related to anxiety or depression like it is willful defiance, will only make it worse. Rather, if a child shows significantly more behavoral issues than their peers, it is advised to seek professional help.

Anxiety and Depression in Autistic Children

Many of the signs of childhood anxiety and depression are common in autistic children. It may therefore be hard to tell whether a symptom is due to anxiety or depression or it is due to autsm. For example, many autistic children (and adults) fidget as a way of regulating sensory input. Treating this and other sensory difficulties as anxiety will make it worse, as treatment for anxiety might include exposure. If a sensory stimulus is physically uncomfortable or painful rather than feared, no amount of exposure will cure this.

Social withdrawal is also a common sign of both childhood anxiety and depression and autism. However, to autistic children and adults, social interaction is often overwhelming, so again, withdrawal may be a coping strategy rather than a symptom.

Interestngly, some autistics may appear less autistic when they’re depressed or anxious. This may be the case if the autistic’s normal social interaction style is “active but odd”, eg. talking on and on about a particular topic without regard for the other person. For example, I once read about a teenage boy who usually kept on talking about trains. When he stopped perseverating on this topic, his carers assumed he was doing better. After all, he was showing less socially disruptive behavior. In reality, the boy was seriously depressed. He was, for him, withdrawn and had lost interest in what used to be a favorite topic of his.

My Achievements in 2016

The year 2016 is almost over and I feel pretty disappointed. It should’ve been the year in which I finally left the mental institution, but I didn’t. I mean, I’ve been resolving to leave the hospital every single year since 2008, but this time I thought I was so close. It’s even worse, because I get blamed for not having achieved this goal. My psychologist tells me I never want to leave and that I try every single trick to delay my discharge. This to her proves my dependent personalty disorder. Well, it wasn’t me who took four months to come up with that diagnosis. It wasn’t me who still hasn’t referred me to outpatient treatment and it wasn’t because for whatever reason I blocked this – I didn’t.

In many other ways, this year has been a disappointment. Still, I need to focus on the things that I did achieve in 2016. They may not feel important to me at this point, but that is only a matter of perspective.

1. I have not been in seclusion all year. I tend to think that, because I’m supposed to leave and there’s no seclusion outside of the institution, staff are less likely to ask me to go into seclusion. There is likely some truth to this, but I also have been acting out much less over the past year than I used to. It isn’t over yet – I broke a mug and self-injured only a few days ago. It’s better though.

2. My daily medication has been stable all year. I did finally get a prescription for a benzodiazepine to use at most twice a week as-needed. I hardly need it though.

3. I managed to binge eat less than I did last year. Though I resolved to get my BMI under 30 and this was a massive fail, my weight remained stable over the year.

4. We got an elliptical trainer at home. Though I didn’t use it as regularly as I’d have liked, I enjoyed exercsing when I did.

5. I found a craft that I enjoy. This is one of my biggest wins of 2016. Though I don’t make soap or skin care products as regularly as I intended to anymore, half a year in I still enjoy the craft. I also finally felt confident enough to make soaps and skin care products for other people. I never quite felt as self-confident about my other crafts. Recently, I experienced some setbacks, in that a few soaps I made over the past few weeks turned out worse than even my first soaps. However, I’m not about to give up (yet).

6. I didn’t give up blogging, even though I was tempted. I kept up one Dutch blog from early June until now, although December was a bad month. Consistent with more posts here, as always, my posting on there declined. I’m not about to give up eithehr blog though.

In short, my theme for 2016 has been “persevere”. I faced many setbacks and disappointments, but I didn’t give up. I hope that 2017 will be better than 2016, but if it isn’t, I hope I will keep on persevering.

You Baby Me Mummy