Tag Archives: Memory

Psychological Evaluation

Last week, I would’ve had my ten year Aspieversary/autiversary or the anniversary of my autism diagnosis. I did realize this and even started writing a blog post about it, but it didn’t feel right to celebrate an anniversary of something that no longer is. After all, I’m no longer diagnosed as autistic. I was also quite shocked when it dawned upon me that I’d been institutionalized for almost the entirety of these ten years. I then started thinking about the ten years before that and how much longer they seemed to have taken. Time flies when you’re getting old(er).

I then started writing a post on the psychological evaluation that I had the day before my would-be-Aspieversary. That was hard too – both the evaluation and writing about it. For the first time that I had a psycholoigical assessment, the personality testing was in fact the easiest – or least difficult – part. I just can’t get past the fact that I did rather poorly on some of the neuropsychological tests and didn’t seem to score as great on the intelligence test.

The neuropsych testing consisted of a couple of memory tests. Most went okay, but with one, I kept losing focus. Then there was a test for semantics, the way words and their meanings are formed and articulated. I had to name as may words starting with a given letter or in a given category (animals, occupations) in one minute as possible. In the animals category, I started blurting out donkey, squirrel and Brazilian wandering spider, which are three words I use repetitively, and then I got stuck. I don’t know what the average score is of course, but some of my staff tried this one and did much better than I did. Of course, they weren’t in an actual test setting.

Then I got what I think is the verbal part of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. Older versions of this intelligence test consist of a verbal and a non-verbal (performance) part, but the performance part isn’t possible for me because I’m blind. The current version does not provide a verbal or performance IQ score, but it still consists of verbal and non-verbal tasks. I did okay and still seemed to have the same strengths (similarities, arithmetic) and weaknesses (compreheension) as when I last had an intelligence test twelve years ago. I don’t think I scored as mind-blowingly high as my parents would want me to though. When I told my mother so, she said I just don’t want to know that I’m gifted. I don’t know whether she meant that I didn’t try my best or that I underestimated my actual performance.

I also got some tests that seem to be specific to autism. One of them was a kind of weird test that seemed to measure theory of mind. I heard these little stories and then had to say whether a character had said something inappropriate. Then there were follow-up questions abou thow each character would feel, whether they could know that what they said was inappropriate, etc. I got rather frustrated with this test.

Some of the questionnaires also seemed to be relevant to my possible autism. One was some kind of systemizing/empathizing test. I once took a similar (or the same) test online and scored below-average on both scales. I mean, I am interested in systemizing, but I can’t actually do it right in daily life. For example, I can’t balance a checkbook, but I do take an interest in random strings of information, such as share prices (yes, I did at one point perseverate on that). There was also this test that asked about the ability to read one’s own feelings. This was a rather weird one to me, but that may be because I barely understand how anyone would be able to tell the difference between for example feelign excited and feeling enthusiastic.

Lastly, I got a coping sytles questionnaire and several personality tests. I scored high on avoidance twelve years ago when I got the same coping styles questionnaire and I think that has only gotten worse. After all, all I’ve learned in the mental hospital is to distract or take a tranquilizer. This is the worst coping style according to my college psychology professor. I did okay on the personality tests. I mean, it’s likely I have at least some personality disorder traits, but that’d show in my behavior too anyway.

A week has gone by since the psychological evaluation. My husband had to fill out another questionnaire about me again over the week-end. It was some kind of executive functioning questionnaire and I felt rather awkward at how many boxes my husband ticked. I also got a call from the student doing the evaluation on Monday with one more questionnaire. It seemed to be the other half of the systemizing/empathizing thing. I got to do that over the phone. The student also asked for my E-mail address, so that the psychologist could contact me regarding some questions and concerns I had written down and taken to the assessment.

I have mixed feelings about the possible outcomes of the assessment. I mean, I don’t even know whether I want to be autistic after all. Of course, you’d think, most people wouldn’t choose to be autistic over neurotypical. That’s not what’s at stake here though, since I won’t change neurotype if the psychologist diagnoses me one way or the other. I still think I need the validation that my impairments are real. Realizing these impairments makes me feel a little inferior to the people I love, and in that sense, it’d be great if I made them all up. Of course, that may be internalized ableism.

Me Want It (But Me Wait): Teaching Self-Control to Children

In the summer of 2013, Sesame Street released a fabulous video in which Cookie Monster is learning about self-control. Self-control is an important skill for children to master, as it will help them succeed at school and manage their behavior at home. Naturlly, young children have no self-control. Children with ADHD or similar issues may lack self-control up till a much older age./P>

There are many ways in which a parent can teach a child self-control. With babies, you need to begin by modeling. Remain calm yourself when your child is distressed. There may be various ways in which a baby is calmed. Some need lots of physical contact, while others need to be laid down for a bit. People vary in their opinion on self-soothing, ie. whether you need to attend to a baby when crying or ignore them. I think it depends on the baby.

Listening skills are a first requirement. Teach your child to come when you call them. Rigidly enforcing social skills like eye contact may not be appropriate for some children, like those with autism, but your child needs to learn to listen to their name and to attend to you.

When a young child cannot get what they want, cannot do what they want to do, or for another reason gets frustrated, they may tantrum. For a one-year-old, consequences don’t work, but distraction does. When your child is a little older, like from the age of two on, use brief time-outs as a consequence for tantrums. Like I’ve said before, make sure your child knows when the time-out is over. This means for a young child that you will need to call them back out of time-out. Again, this reinforces listening skills. For older children, you can ask that they come back when they’ve calmed, but this may not work for children who are still unable to understand their own emotions, like most children with autism. You can point out signs of them being calm again when you call them back out of time-out. This may help children learn about their own emotions and behaviors.

Besides giving consequences for impulsive behavior or tantrums, it’s also very important to reward self-control. If you’ve promised your child ice cream after dinner and they’ve behaved according to your reasonable expectations, give them the ice cream. That way a child learns that not only will impulsivity be punished, but also that patience and self-control are indeed going to get you farther along in life.

Motivation is not the same as self-control. If a child can focus fine on a computer game but not when tidying their room, that’s not a problem with self-control. It is more likely that they lack the motivation to tidy their room. It is however possible to change your attitude. Children will need help with this. For example, as a parent, you may turn tidying the child’s room into a game. You also need to model the right attitude. If you approach tasks like they’re nasty chores, much energy will go into motivating yourself to do the task. If you approach them with a positive attitude, you will find it’s much easier to stay motivated and thereby use your self-control skills. With children (and as adults!) who have a special interest, you can use the special interest as part of the nasty chore.

Of course, there are other skills required for completing tasks besides motivation. Your child will need to have the attention span to focus, the working memory to remember what they need to do, and the organizational skills to plan their task and get it actually finished. Until I did my research for this post, I thought this was the problem with me, but then I realized I can focus fine on this blog post, which requires reading and summarizing multiple sources. I’m now thinking that motivation may be an issue for me, and see above for solving that.

However, when someone truly has poor atttenion, working memory and/or organizational skills, these skills still can be trained at least in children. Computer-based games that reinforce memory or attention have some evidence of effecitveness behind them. Similarly, there are games that reinforce self-control directly. You know the game of stop and go, where a green light means go and a red light means stop? When the child is used to these rules, reverse them and your child will practice keeping their impulse to follow the original rules in check. I’m pretty sure there are computer-based variations to this game.