Tag Archives: Employability

My Experience Being on Disability Benefits #Write31Days

Welcome to day 3 in the 31 Days of Autism. Today, I want to wrote about employment or the lack thereof.

I never worked. I didn’t even have a summer job as a teen. I even only babysat for the neighbors once when my sister was ill. When I had to write a resume in college, I put the few barely-active E-mail lists I owned on it, LOL.

When I was seventeen, my parents told me I hd to apply for disability income. I was told it was just to make up for the work non-disabled college students do besides studying. This may be one reason my sister is still a bit jealous, as she never worked and hence didn’t have an income in college (other than her student loan).

I never had any trouble going on disability. I didn’t even have to meet the social security agency’s doctor or employment specialist face-to-face. It was all handled by a simple phone conversation with me and my parents and a few bits of information from my family doctor.

Note that I hadn’t been dagnosed with autism when I was first approved for disability in 2004. Once diagnosed, my support worker wrote a letter to the social security agency informing them of several things: I had been diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome, had dropped out of college and had been admiitted to a psychiatric hospital. I probably would’ve had to notify the social security agency that I’m no longer in a hospital, but I don’t know how to go about this.

In 2010, the law on disablity income for people who were disabled from childhood on was revised. I don’t know what was changed, but I heard that at least there was talk of not giving people disability benefits from age 18, instead moving the age threshhold to 27. I wasn’t yet 27 by that time, but maybe those already on disability were exempt. Also, those in institutions were talked of being exempt from this rule, and I obviously was.

In 2015, the Participation Act went into effect. This means people won’t get disability payments if they can do a task that is part of a job (instead of being employable in an actual job), have basic employee skills, can work for at least an hour on end and can work for at least four hours a day. In any case, it’s extremely hard to go on disability now. I was still institutionalized when I received the letter at home saying I had no employment potential. My husband jokes that the letter was full of zeros.

Before I’d received the letter, I had worried incredibly. Now that I checked an explanation of the components of employment potential, I’m worried all over again. A Dutch law firm states: “If you wash the dishes at home, you may have employment potential.” This was nuanced a bit to say that, for example, if you volunteer in a sports club cafeteria doing the washing up, this counts as a task. Interestingly though, I don’t think effectiveness or speed are counted in, but they do play a role in the one-hour and four-hour rules.

Many people I know, even those requiring a lot of support, are not approved for disability income under the Participation Act. I am just so glad I am.