Tag Archives: Day Activities

#WeekendCoffeeShare for June 16, 2018

I have seriously been meaning to write more and have had a few ideas floating around my head. Someohow though I could never find the energy or motivation to actually sit down and write a post. This week, a lot happened, so it’s about time I join in Alli’s #WeekendCoffeeShare again.

If we were having coffee, first I’d tell you all about the visit to a few possible new day activities places last Monday. There were four places that I would be visiting: a day center like the one I go to now, an industrial workshop, an arts place and a farm. The care consultant explained about each place and said the farm was pretty large and low-support, so I would most likely not be able to do much there. I don’t like industrial work, so I turned that one down too. The arts place, we did visit, but it didn’t turn out to be suitable. They mostly do textile arts, painting and drawing there, none of which I can do. They also do ceramics, which I can do but don’t usually like. It was also rather crowded and noisy there.

The day center consists of four groups, two of which are relatively high-support. I was shown around these two groups. The first one, which is the highest-support one, seemed really suitable. They have arund a 1:5 staff/client ratio, which is similar to my current group and is doable for me. The group seemed a little more structured than my current group. They go for walks regularly. They also have a garden with some swings and a rocking lounger. The center has a sensory room near this group. I spoke to one of the staff for this group, who happened to have seen me at the horseback riding school a few times. You see, some people from this day center go horseback riding there too. They also go swimming every other Tuesday. I assume this is only for peoople for whom a volunteer buddy can be found, but I hope that should I transfer here, I can do this too.

I was up front about the fact that I could have meltdowns if my irritability isn’t acknowledged and dealt with on time. I think though that if I transfer here, the consultant from the Center for Consultation and Expertise (CCE) can help us figure out a good support plan.

We also visited the other group, where people do mostly table-based activities. This group was a little more crowded and lower-support and I like walking and sensory activities more than table-based tasks. I ultimately chose to try out at the first group. On June 25 and 26, I’ll be spending the mornings there. We’ll be evaluating this on the 26th. I have decided to wait to potentially transfer till we’ve spoken to the CCE consultant on July 31.

I can’t convey through writing how excited I am about this possible new opportunity. I really hope it works out. Transportation may be an issue, but I have my hopes up that this will be sorted out.

Next, I’d be sharing about my next session of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) with my nurse practitioner. It was good. We discussed rational, emotional and wise mind. Wise mind is like intuition, the integration of emotion and reason. One of the goals of DBT is to get into wise mind more often.

Last week, I had called the on-duty nurse at the psychiatric unit because I was close to a crisis due to feeling very lonely. I had initially felt really bad about having called, because loneliness is a common reason for me to land in near-crisis and need to call them. My nurse practitioner validated me, saying I don’t have their phone number for no reason.

If we were having coffee, I’d share about my weight loss this past week. I lost 1.5kg in just over a week. Now this evening we went to an all-you-can-eat restaurant, so I’ve probably gained it back, but I’ll lose it again soon enough. I also met the recommended daily step goal (10,000 steps) again on Wednesday.

What have you been up to lately?

#WeekendCoffeeShare for May 26, 2018

Today, I’m linking up with Ali’s #WeekendCoffeeShare. The idea behind #WeekendCoffeeShare is to catch up on how your week has been. It’s a good way to share how you’ve been doing without having to devote a separate blog post to everything you’re up to. So sit back and grab a cup of your favorite drink (it’s rather late for coffee here).

The week started off rather relaxed with Monday being a holiday because of it being the day after Pentecost. That being said, I don’t really like days off, as I tend to sleep away the day anyway and feel bored when I’m awake. I’d have rather gone to day activities.

When I came to day activities again on Tuesday, I was a little anxious. There’s a family day at the center next week. Originally, my mother-in-law would be attending, but given the fact that I’m being kicked out of this center anyway, I feel it’d be useless. Besides, I have an appointment with my psychiatric nurse practitioner for dialectical behavior therapy that afternoon. I just told a white lie by omission and said my appointment was the reason I and my mother-in-law won’t be there.

On Wednesday, I had an okay day. My home support coordinator came by. She’d visit me on Thursday too, as my regular home support worker couldn’t come. I may get another support worker in her place, as she has a rather heavy workload. My mother-in-law also took me on some errands.

I found out on Thursday that things might not be as hopeless on the day activities front as I thought them to be. My support coordinator had contacted a day activities farm about 25km from my house. Farming isn’t my ideal sort of day activities, but I’m willing to go take a look there. The coordinator for that place had referred her to another person for placement inquiries. This placement person said they have three other day activities places in that area, all roughly 20-25km from my home. This is quite a bit farther off than the 15km to my current day activities (which is already relatively far), so transportation may be an issue. However, I’m sure my support coordinator will find a solution to this. I’ll be going to visit all four places on June 11. There is the farm, which was said to be good for those seeking experience-based activities too, so you’re not necessarily required to work hard. Then there’s an industrial place (but the placement person said not to worry about pressure), an artsy place with a shop and a day center similar to the one I attend now.

I am feeling slightly optimistic about one of these places possibly being a good fit for me. I actually am thinking of mentioning my experience with soap and skin care product making in hopes that I can get the support to pick up that hobby again, either at the artsy place or the day center.

Yesterday I went to the adaptive riding school for horseback riding. Everyone in my class was more noisy than usual and I experienced a bit of overload. Nonetheless, I enjoyed riding my current horse, Angie.

Today, my husband and I went to my in-laws to spend the afternoon and part of the evening. My in-laws have a pretty large house in the countryside. They have horses there. I helped brush one of my mother-in-law’s horses, Remco. We also ate homemade pizza. One half of each of our pizzas had a cauliflower crust. I actually liked it better than the regular crust.

What have you been up to this past week?

An Eventful Week

And again I didn’t write for an entire week. The past week was rather eventful and stressful. I have been distracting mmyself by going on Tumblr and attempting to start something up there. I’ve had one Tumblr account or another ever since 2008 but never quite understood how it works and still I really don’t. However, I’m enjoying the community of mental health users there.

The reason the week was stressful was because of a lot of emotion-evoking events. First, my grandma died Saturday night. This caused a lot of emotions in me, because my grandma was the only family member I had a good relationship with. Her funeral was yesterday and it was good to see a lot of aunts, uncles and cousins I rarely see at all. The funeral service was good. My sister spoke on behalf of the grandchildren. I couldn’t help but laugh at some of the stories she told.

Another emotional event was the orientation meeting with the coordinator from the Center for Consultation and Expertise (CCE) on my situation re day activities. In attendance were the CCE coordinator, my day activities and home support staff, my mother-in-law (who acts as my informal representative), the local authority social consultant, my psychiatric nurse practitioner and me. The coordinator does the first meeting. If she decides it’s necessary, she’ll involve one or more consultants who will help find solutions to the situation at hand.

As it turns out, my day activities staff were hardly open to any suggestions from the CCE coordinator that would allow me to stay at this center. They kept making excuses about my meltdonws (which I haven’t had in a while) causing seizures and aggressive outbursts in other clients. This never really happened. Besides, these other clients get seizures/outbursts from a lot of behavior that other fellow clients exhibit too. I myself witnessed this on Monday.

We discussed the reasons for my meltdowns. Sensory ovelroad, demands and stress often set me off. The CCE coordinator asked whether I’d ever had a sensory integration assessment. I haven’t. It was at one point suggested by another consultant but my then psychologist (the one who kicked me out of the institution last year) dismissed this. Same for the trauma therapy recommended by the CCE consultant when we had a consultation in 2010.

We also discussed my living situation. This had not been the direct reason for contacting the CCE, but now that we had them involved anyway, my home support coordinator suggested we discuss this too. It is really hard. I mean, I experience a lot of stress now that I live independently with my husband. I was open about the worsening of my depression, including suicidal thoughts. I don’t want to die though, so the CCE coordinator asked what I do want. I honestly don’t know. At one point, the CCE coordinator also asked me directly whether I’d have wanted to live independently had the psychologist not kicked me out of the institution. I said “No”. My home support coordinator talked about the possibility of me and my husband moving closer to supported housing. This may be very difficult bureaucratically, as psychiatric diagnoses (including autism) don’t qualify you for long-term care, but maybe the CCE can help us figure this out.

I have mixed feelings about the meeting. I am somewhat hopeful but also a little pessimistic. Since the day activities staff aren’t open to solutions that will allow me to stay there, we’re at the mercy of a possible other day activities center. I hope we can find one.

Memories: Remembering Painful Events #AtoZChallenge

Welcome to my belated day 13 post in the #AtoZChallenge of random reflections. Today, I chose yet another prompt from the 397 journal writing prompts and ideas. It is “Memory” and the prompt is to share your most painful memory. That is really hard, as I have a lot ofpainful memories and also tend to dissociate when remembering painful events. So I’m just going to ramble.

The first memory that came to mind is that of the day I was admitted to the mental hospital. This was November 2, 2007. I’m pretty sure I shared the details of that day already though, but oh well. I had been planning on returning home from my parents’ city that day, but freaked out at the train station. The police were called and removed me. I wandered through the city for a few hours. The police were called several times and instead of speaking to me, they called the training home in that city, in which I’d been a resident before moving to another city. In the evening, I was close to the training home and a fellow client called me into her apartment. She said I could sleep at hers fo the night and we would find a solution the next morning. However, the staff came in and kicked me out. That was when I spiraled into full-blown crisis. I walked to the nearby bus stop. In my memory, the sun was shining brightly, but this isn’t possible, as it was 8PM in November. I phoned my support worker and the training home’s coordinator to let them know I was going to commit suicide. This was what led the bus driver to call the police, who took me to the police station and called the crisis service.

Another memory that came to mind happened 9 1/2 years later. It was the “exit meeting” I had with my psychologist in late April, 2017. I tried desperately to get her to see that I needed support once leaving the hospital after 9 1/2 years. She didn’t see my point. Apparently, it had all been my responsibility to make sure I get after care, as I supposedly didn’t want anything. Because it was thought back then that a simple phone call to the day activiities manager for the center I go to now, would sole everything, I was given a week’s extra time. As it turns out now, the day activities manager interpreted it as me only needing day activities at his center for a short while. This is backfiring now that I’m being kicked out of there.

Both of these are not the most painful memories I have. Those are childhood memories. However, I don’t want to trigger myself by sharing them.

Joyous: The Last Time I Felt Genuinely Joyful #AtoZChallenge

Welcome to day 10 in the A to Z of random reflections. Today, I picked yet another prompt from the 397 jorurnal writing prompts and ideas. It is “joyous” and asks about the last time you felt joy.

Now I for one aim to find joy in little everyday things. However, for a long time, I have been distinctly remembering th elast time I felt genuinely happy. This was in November. Let me share.

We had a “day out” at day activities. We weren’t actually going anywhere, but the money the staff used to organize this special day for us was originally intended to take us on a trip. Since many of my fellow clients are severely intellectually disabled, they wouldn’t benefit more from an actual day out than they would from a special celebratory day at the center, or so the staff reasoned.

In the morning, two female clowns were visiting the center. They visited each group separately, so we didn’t have to all come together. It was a lot of fun. First, one clown called out a fellow client’s name. I chimed in, calling her name in my typical echolalia voice. This got the clown to think I had this client’s name as well, so she came to me. I was allowed to feel her clown shoes and hat and we also danced a little.

After the clowns left, a local snack bar sent a vendor with French fries and all sorts of snacks. I attend a group for severely intellectually disabled people, so for my fellow clients and initially for me too, the staff was deciding which snack we would eat. I asked to visit the industrial group (for more capable people). As it turned out, we were allowed to get as many snacks as we wanted, so I had some fellow clients from the industrial group help me to the vendor. I didn’t binge, but I definitely ate more than would’ve been healthfully responsible. Then again, we only get this type of event once in at least a year.

What was the last time you felt genuinely happy?

Changes

This week has been rather eventful and yet, nothing really did happen. A lot of changes are on the horizon for me, yet nothing has really changed yet.

First, I found out a few weeks ago that next week, my primary day activities staff will be leaving the day center. It is great for her, as she’ll embark on a new and challenging path in her career. For me though, it’s quite hard. Some of my other staff and family have been askign whether I mind at all, since I’ve been struggling at day activities and she was the one who filed the incident report that led to my day activities hours being cut. Yes, I do mind, since despite this, I like this staff a lot.

Then on Thursday, I found out that my CPN is leaving too. It’s also to embark on a new and challenging path in her career, but it’s sad nonetheless. My CPN and I have had quite a few misunderstandings over the ten months so far that we’ve worked together. However, I’ve noticed that I did make progress. It seems odd, since both my husband and my psychiatrist have been commenting on how I didn’t get far on the DBT course yet and it’s apparently my CPN’s fautl. Apparently, she should be limiting my bringing up only indirectly related topics.

I know the nurse practitioner who will be replacing her already from my intake interview last year. It is a slight disadvantage that he’s male, but other than that, I think I could get along with him just fine. However, it’s still a bit stressful that so many people are leaving at the same time. After all, my nurse will also be taken off my case. We’re not yet 100% sure who will be replacing her.

On Friday, I had a meeting with my psychiatrist. We discussed my progress on the DBT course, my medication and I mentioned I’ve been rather depressed lately. I did say it’s been going on for half a year already, so if I can hold it together for that long, it must not be that bad. She ignored this comment and proposed to increase the dose of my citalopram from 20 to 30mg. It’s a bit scary, since I’ve been on 20mg ever since 2010 with no med review whatsoever and I didn’t even know why I’d been prescribed it. IN this sense, I like it that my psychiatrist did ask to see me in a month’s time for an evaluation. I really do hope the med increase will help with mood improvement.

Update on Day Activities

I have not written a diary-style entry in a while, even though I hoped it’d help me write more often. The past few weeks have been rather eventful with things needing to be worked out for my day activities. Not that anything concrete has come out of it yet, but today, I am hopeful that something will.

In early February, we had a “big meeting” to discuss how to proceed now that my day activities hours were cut and I would maybe have to leave this day center. It was decided that we’d involve the Center for Consultation and Expertise (CCE) to help us detail my support needs. In the meantime, my home support hours were doubled as to give my support coordinator some time to help me find a new place.

My CPN took it upon herself to call the CCE. I don’t know how the conversation between her and the CCE person went, but they concluded eventually that my problem was mainly my blindness. I didn’t understand why, since I’d been almost kicked out of day activities for self-injurious behaviors and meltdowns – not your average blind person’s everyday behavior. The whole thing frustrated me to no end, as blindness agencies have consistently said that my main problem is definitely not my blindness and now the CCE was referring me back to them.

When I read my CPN’s notes on the meeting in which she told me about her conversation with the CCE, I got an idea where the misunderstanding had come from. She wrote about my anxiey regarding demands in light of my having to learn new skills. I figured she’d told the CCE person about the recommendation that I get independent living skills training, which is not the CCE’s department. They offer consultations in situations where the client falls through the cracks because of severe problem behavior, after all. Resistance to demands does not necessarily present with severe problem behavior, I suppose.

When I asked my CPN for clarification though last week, I found out that she doesn’t even believe I have severe problem behaviors. I’m not 100% sure either that my behaviors are severe enough for the CCE, but my CPN’s reasoning for dismissing my problem behaviors altogether was rather strange: I wouldn’t be able to be married if I had problem behaviors. She also mentioned that I wouldn’t be able to live independently in that case either, which I understand. Then again, with today’s budget cuts to mental health and long-term care, once living in the community, you’d need to be virtually dead to be admitted back to an institution. Maybe a virtually dead person is the kind of case the CCE usually works on too, and in all fairness, I’m not dead.

I was badly triggered by my CPN’s comments. What mostly triggered me was her saying that I had “escaped” an institution. I hadn’t. I had been kicked out.

Later last week, my support coordinator talked to my CPN about her feeling that we should at least try to get the CCE involved based on my full story. We worked on the application this afternoon, but didn’t finish it yet, as I was getting overwhelmed.

As for finding me a new place for day activities, we currently have two organizations we’re still in contact with. Both are organizations serving primarily intellectually disabled people. Neither has offered me an orientation meeting yet, but at least neither has rejected me yet. Two other organizations did reject me and several others, we are still thinking on contacting but are most likely unsuitable.

Detailing My Support Needs

Last week, I wrote about wondering why I seem to have high support needs. The painful truth is, I may never know the answer. After all, most neuropsychological tests that would show executive dysfunction, performance IQ tests and such cannot be administered to me because I’m blind. Even tests that can be administered may not show my actual performance in daily life, because a one-on-one testing situation is different from for example day activities in a group.

In 2013, we had the Center for Consultation and Expertise (CCE) write out my support needs in order to hand those to the local authority once I’d leave the institution so they could decide on care funding accordingly. All my needs were written down really vaguely, particularly those for day activities. I needed a place where I could do creative activities for at least four mornings a week. No detail was given to how much support I’d need doing those creative activities.

As it turns out, the CCE is unwilling to even see me again, as they judged from a phone call with my community psychiatric nurse that the main problem is my blindness. As such, I guess no-one will ever be able to help me detail my support needs, so I am going to write them out myself here. I will include the supports my husband provides me.

During a week day, I can get up, shower and dress myself without assistance. Usually, I eat yoghurt with muesli for breakfast, which I can prepare myself with some difficulty. However, when I spill food doing so, I usually either don’t notice or don’t remember or know how to clean it up. This is a source of irritation with my husband, as he doesn’t know whether I’m just too lazy to clean up after myself or there’s some genuine issue preventing me from doing it. I can’t put my finger on exactly what the issue is either, at least not when I do remember that I need to clean up. When I forget, I honestly don’t know what the issue is either, as I am not known to have a bad memory according to tests. All I know is that all the “rules” that I have to remember regarding proper cleaning up, feel incredibly overwhelming.

I take my morning meds without reminders, but my husband has to put them in my medication box. He does this once a week. My evening meds, I often forget even with a reminder. I have set an alarm at 8PM on my phone for them, but when I can’t drop what I’m doing at that moment and run right to my medicine box, I often forget to take them later.

I have finally learned within the last year to brush my teeth without reminders each morning and evening. I still have an aversion to the feel and taste of toothpaste, but have learned to tolerate it now, though I can’t manage to brush for two minutes. I often spill toothpaste everywhere. I do try to clean it up, but often I don’t see where I’ve spilled the toothpaste (on my face, my clothes, etc.). My day activities staff often remind me to clean my face and sweater even though I’ve tried to before leaving for day activities.

I arrive at day activities at around 8:45AM. Usually, the cab driver or a day activities staff helps me to my group’s room, though I think I could navigate the building independently if I really needed to. My day activities staff gets me a cup of coffee. At home, I can make a cup of Senseo coffee myself.

At day activities, I run into several different issues. First, I find it hard to decide for myself what I’m going to do when it’s free time or the staff are busy caring for another client. When I have something to do, for example an activity on my phone or a sensory activity that I can do independently, I’m usually fine unless I get distracted, ovelroaded or frustrated.

I can navigate my group’s room and the day center with some assistance. For example, when I need to go to the bathroom, I can usually find it by myself but need some assistance when for example someone has moved the toilet paper. I can sometimes go to the snoezelen (sensory) room independently, but usually a staff takes me there so they can see if I can find all the supplies I need there. At home, I move through the house without any assistance and without my white cane. I cannot navigate the backyard though and after nine months of living here still need some directions finding my way to the front door from the cab or my husband’s car.

My husband prepares my lunch for me, as this is bread with sandwich spread or peanut butter, which I can’t prepare myself. I need no other assistance during lunch time. During dinner, my husband puts the food on my plate. As of this week, I have a curved sppon, but I’m as of yet undecided as to whether it is easier to eat with it. I still spill a lot of food. Regarding drinking, I can sometimes pour myself a soft drink (depending on the weight/size of the can). I can if I really need to make myself a cup of tea, but for safety reasons I prefer to have tea only when my husband or support staff are with me. I can get water independently, but often forget to drink enough of it despite my husband having given me a one-liter bottle.

My husband cooks and does the cleaning. I sometimes, when I spill something in my own room, try to clean it up, but I tend to at least feel rather awkward doing so. I don’t have any idea as of how often to clean my room or whatever. This again annoys my husband, as he says I can do it.

The hard part is, I learned to do a lot of the things I now need assistance with independently when I was in blindness training from 2005 to 2007. It may be tempting to say the problem is my blindness and I just need more training. Here we come back to the beginning, which is that for whatever reason, it feels completely overwhelming, but I don’t know why.

Spectrum Sunday

Are My Day Activities Challenging Enough?

Last night, I was flooded with memories of elementary school. I attended a school for the blind that was next to a school or institution or whatever for people with intellectual disabilities from fourth to sixth grade. The school for the blind I went ot also had a departmnet for those with “multiple disabilities”, which referred just to visual and intellectual disability. I mean, I attended the single-disability department even though I’m autistic and have a mild otor impairment in addition to blindness. Of course, no-one acknowledged that. Besides, like I said, “multiply-disabled” always somehow includes an intellectual disability.

I remember when our teacher told us about snoezelen. Snoezelen is a type of sensory activity where the person with a disablity goes into a room where the sensory environment can completely be controlled by that person or their staff. It struck a chord with me as soon as I heard of it. Now, more than twenty years later, it’s one of my favorite activities at the day center. It is usually catered towards people wiht severe intellectual disabilities.

At around the same time, a girl was in the news who was being restrained long-term in an institution in Utrecht. She had a mild intellectual disability, so mild that she had two years previously been able to attend a low-level high school. She was judged to be too intelligent for intellectual disabilities services but couldn’t be served adequately anywhere else. She was eventually transferred to a psychiatric institution for youth with intellectual disabilities.

This story struck an enormous chord with me. I knew I wasn’t intellectually disabled, but my school didn’t think I was very bright either and above all, I had significant behavioral challenges.

It’s a shame that, more than twenty years after this girl was in the news, still, disability services are so segregated according to IQ. I am hugely lucky that I’m allowed to use the snoezelen room and even attend the group for the most severely intellectually disabled people at my day center. My recent outbursts do get people to believe this wasn’t the right decision after all. My home support coordinator said this afternoon that, if I could be moved back to the industrial group, I may’ve been able to stay at this day center. I doubt it, since at the industrial group, I had more outbursts than now that I’m at the sensory group.

I remember being told about snoezelen once more, during a college lecture when I took applied psychology. The professor told us about it being suitable to those with end-stage Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Again, not a positive image of this activity as soothing for people with any kind of disability (or no disability at all).

When I tell people about my problems functioning at day activities, I invariably hear that they’re not challenging enough for me. As much as I’d like to deny this, there is some truth to this. Indeed I get understimulated when I have to sit in a chair for twenty minutes while the other service users use the bathroom. Not that I think the others are particularly excited having to sit on a toilet for that long, but they can’t tell the staff that they’re bored. I also don’t know that I could use the snoezelen room for hours on end. Yesterday, I spent about an hour in it and that was fine, but the other service users and staff were there too. When I’m just dropped in the room alone, I manage for twenty minutes at most.

The problem is though, as much as I’d like to do more challenging activities, I need practically one-on-one support with that and that’s just not possible. The staff/service user ratio at my group is 1:6. At the industrial group, it’s 1:9. That’s just not working if I’m wanting to do any type of remotely challenging activity except for using the computer, which quite frankly I can do at home, too.

I wish I were more independent. I wish snoezelen wasn’t the only activity I can do without help. My sister said maybe I need training to learn new skills. Well, I don’t know where to go for that.

Day Activities: Why Do I Seem to Have High Support Needs?

Yesterday, I had a meeting with my day activities and home support staff, my comunity psychiatric nurse (CPN) and the social consultant (local authority person who decides on care funding) in charge of my case. My mother-in-law also attended. The reason for the meeting was my trouble functioning at day activities.

I go to a day center for people with intellectual disabilities and attend a group within the center for people with severe intellectual and multiple disabilities. I don’t have an intellectual disability, but did seem to do best at this sensory-based group up until recently. Then, three new service users joined us, leading to increasing stimulation, stress and staff workloads. I was increasingly overloaded and irritable, which led to the staff cutting my hours because they couldn’t deal with me on top of the other high-support service users for a full day.

The problem is there’s no clear-cut diagnosis to back up why I function best at a low-stress, sensory-based, high-support group. I mean, yeah, I’m blind, but most people who are blind can work regular jobs. Yeah, I’m autistic, but only diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder level 1 (ie. “high-functioning” autism or Asperger’s Syndrome). Yeah, I have mild motor impairments, but my doctor doesn’t know or can’t tell me to what extent they’re diagnosable (as mild cerebral palsy or something else). Yeah, I have mental health issues, but no-one has a clue to what extent these affect me and what they’re even diagnosable as.

As a result, some professionals and non-professionals choose to deny I have high support needs and tell me it’s all dependence, manipulation or attention-seeking. I was lucky that, with one of these professionals being my former psychologist who got me in touch with my current day center, the day center staff and management were up until recently more than willing to accomodate me. For instance, I started day activities at the industrial group at this center, but was soon moved to the sensory group despite, like I said, not even having an intellectual disability, let alone a severe one.

Now that I’m even falling apart at this group, I hear different opinions on where to go from here. At one point, my home support coordinator said maybe the gap between myself and the other service users at the sensory group is too wide, so we need to look at a different kind of place, like a sheltered art shop. I disagreed and not just because my art-making skills are mediocre at best. At more “job-like” day activities places like this, there’s usually more pressure and less support. My day activities staff agreed, adding that I’d tried the industrial group already.

My CPN’s coworker suggested a care farm. As much as I love animals, I know I won’t even be able to navigate a farm without a sighted guide, let alone care for the animals without one-on-one. My mother suggested I look for day activities tailored to the blind. These don’t exist in my area. Besides, I could barely function at the leisure groups at the blindess training center I attended in 2005. My mother said I may be able to now, but I think it unlikely. These places expect a level of independence I don’t have. I mean, I’ve seen my partially sighted friend make soap completely independently after being instructed by me just once, while I still need practically hands-on support after many attempts.

I’m on the verge of crying as I write this. I completed grammar school, for goodness’ sake! Granted, I burned out the minute I left, but I did it nonetheless. Why can’t I even function at a group where people with profound intellectual disabilities can? Or am I really one giant dependent, manipulative, attention-seeking waste of resources?

My CPN is going to contact the Center for Consultation an dExpertise on me. In 2010, they were briefly involved in my case. The consultant wrote in her report that she thinks it’s weird that I’m so cognitively capable and yet cannot do simple activities of daily living such as prpearing my own breakfast. She also wrote something in the report about not knowing whether I’m eliciting care. In other words, she couldn’t say whether or not I’m just one giant dependent, manipulative, attention-seeking waste of resources either. Sigh.