Tag Archives: Computers

Adaptations and Services I’ve Used to Overcome My Disabilities

Last year, I wrote a post describing my limitations in as much detail as I could then. I got the idea from a disability discussion E-mail list that I was a member of in like 2004. The next discussion topic on the list was to go into adaptations you’ve used to overcome your limitations. Today, I will share about these.

As a toddler, I seem to have gotten by mostly without adaptations. I did have low vision, motor ipairments and was socially a little immature, but nothing too dramatic. I did have many colds until my tonsils and adenoids were removed at age four. I also saw a lot of specialists. For example, when I was about four, I was seen by some kind of rehabilitation physician because I neeed a cast on my left foot. I got lots of physical therapy and other early intervention too. However, I attended a regular preschool and Kindergarten until I fell apart in the spring of my second year of Kindergarten. Kindergarten always takes two years here, but I didn’t finish my second year because of needing to go to a special school that didn’t have a Kindergarten. Instead, I started in first grade early.

At around this age, I mostly got adaptations for my fine and gross motor impairments. For example, I got adapted scissors to be able to cut shapes out without needing to exert too much strength. I also got a large tricycle funded through the local disability services when I was about eight. I’m confused as to where my parents got the necessary doctor’s signature to get this mobility equipment. I mean, I must’ve seen a rehabilitation physician to declare that I had a severe enough mobility impairment, but I wonder whether the ophthalmologist agreed I had enough vision to cycle safely.

Of course, I did have some adaptations for my vision at this point too. I started reading large print in first grade. In fact, I had taught myself to read at around age five with large rub-on letters my Mom would put into little books for me.

By the end of first grade, I had to learn Braille because my vision was deteriorating. I got long keys on my Braille typewriter so that again I didn’t need to exert as much strength. For reading, at first the teachers would provide my Brailled assignments with double line breaks, because I had a hard time with it otherwise. Eventually, I could read Braille just fine, but it didn’t become my preferred reading method until I got a computer.

I still did use the vision I still had. In fact, I stll do, even though I only have light perception and a little light projection left. At age ten or eleven, I got a handheld magnifier. I remember using it to see the large print atlas we had in fifth and sixth grade, even though I really couldn’t make out anything on it.

By the time we moved across the country when I was nine, my parents stopped taking me to medical specialists. There was nothing to be done about my eyesight getting worse and worse and I no longer needed specialist care for my other disabilities. That is, this is my parents’ version of the truth. I think they may be right but there are some things that just don’t add up. Like, from age twelve on, I was accused of deliberately having an odd posture. Guess what? At age fifteen, the school doctor discovoered I had scoliosis. I had to have physcal therapy again.

At age thirteen, I started regular secondary school. I was functionally blind by this time and did my schoolwork on a computer with Braille display. I also got tactile graphics for the STEM subjects and tactile maps for geography. I also got lots of other nifty math tools, most of which I could barely use. I couldn’t even use tactile graphics much at all.

Like I said, I was discharged from all medical specialists at around age nine. At nineteen, when I graduated secondary school, I went back into care at the rehabilitation center for the blind. Besides orientation and mobility, housekeeping and other blindness-related training, I had to get physical therapy again for my scoliosis.

In 2007, I was finally diagnosed with autism and landed in the psychiatric hospital (not at the same time, mind you). My current psychiatrist remarks that I got little in the way of treatment there and she’s right. At first, it was thought I just needed to be moved into a group home and all would be fine, then when I got my last psychologist, it was decided I just needed a good kick in the behind and to move into independent livng as soon as possible.

Now that I’m 31, I don’t really use many adaptive devices other than my Braille display and my white cane, the latter of which I use more for stability than for its intended purpose. My iPhone has a built-in screen reader and I guess it won’t be long until NVDA is almost as good as JAWS for a computer screen reader. NVDA is free and open source, whereas JAWS costs several hundreds of dollars (that thankfully currently health insurance pays for).

I said eye doctors goodbye for good (except when I need a note to say I’m blind) in 2013 when my last chance to get a little sight back failed. I still see a psychiatrist, though my medcation regimen hasn’t changed in years. I have a community psychiatric nurse, whom I see biweekly for dialectical behavior therapy. As for my mobility, I’m due to see my GP on Wednesday to ask about this and about any treatments or adaptations that could help me improve.

Naptime Natter

Adaptations I’ve Used for My Disabilities

A few months ago, I wrote a post in which I described my limitations in as much detail as I could. I had just agreed to settle on a brain injury diagnosis rather than autism, so had to figure myself out all over again. Since then, that diagnosis was revised several more times and I finally decided to want a second opinion. I want answers to what’s going on with me.

The good point of that post I wrote, however, is that I felt free to describe my limitations in a non-judgmental way. As a follow-up, I am going to write a post today on the adaptations I’ve used throughout my life for dealing with these limitations.

The first adaptations I remember using, when I was about four, were not for what most people think of as my primary disability, ie. blindness. When I was four or five, I had to have my left foot in a cast to prevent my heel cord from becoming too short. This problem is common in children wth motor difficulties like cerebral palsy, though it occasionally happens to children with other neurological conditions too. I also had limited strength in my hands, so I got to use scissors which bounce back automatically. When I finally got to use a Braille typewriter, it had lengthened keys which were easier to press, too.

When I went to the school for the visually impaired at the end of Kindergarten, I was introduced to large print adn later Braille. I started learning Braille when I was seven-years-old. Because I was a print reader before I became a Braille reader, I had an advantage and a disadvantage. I could already read and knew my letters, but Braille wasn’t my first written language. I didn’t become truly proficient at Braille till I was around twelve and still can’t read it as fast as some blind people.

Apparently, around age seven, I had enough vision to ride a bike. I didn’t have the balance though. I still don’t know whether it was my parents being pushy or I truly had enough vision to safely ride a bike, but in any case I got a large trike paid for through the city department of disability services. My parents transported it to our new city when we moved when I was nine, even though this required approval from the authorities. I used the tricycle for about five years, until I became too blind to safely ride it even for purely leisurely purposes in my quiet neighborhood.

By the time I transferred to the school for the blind at age nine, I no longer needed most adaptations for my motor difficulties. I could use a regular Braille typewriter and in fourth grade, we weren’t crafting anymore anyway, so no scissors. I had also by this time become a full-time Braille user, though particularly in fifth and sixth grade I still peeked at the large print atlas every now and again. I got a handheld magnifier for my birthday or St. Nicholas around that time, because without it I couldn’t use the atlas. I had a large collection of tactile maps too, which I also loved.

When I was eleven, I got my first laptop with Braille display. I had occasionally used my parents’ computer before then, but had by this time long been too blind to even see very large letters on the screen. I tried for a bit to use a screen magnifier on the school computer, but I quickly learned to use Braille and syntehtic speech on my own computer.

I also had a white cane, of course. I started cane travel lessons when I was around seven, but rarely used my cane until I was fourteen. Then, when I had entered eighth grade in mainstream education, I had realized I was going to look blind compared to all fully sighted fellow students anyway so I’d better use a cane.

I went through school using mostly my computer for learning. We had a number of tactile educational materials, but I rarely used these. I hated tactile drawings, because I had an extremely hard time figuring them out.

In college and university, I used my computer with Braille display only. I also had gotten a scanner, so that I could scan books that weren’t available in accessible formats. A few years ago, I bought myself an OpticBook scanner that is especially good for scanning books. I rarely used it though, because eBooks became accessible to screen reader users in like 2013. I also rediscovered the library for the blind and last summer, like I’ve said, became Bookshare member.

I never used adaptations for cognitive impairments even after my autism diagnosis. I wanted to learn to use some and I still badly want to get a weighted blanket someday. I also am currently exploring adaptations for my fine motor issues. Because I felt more secure this way, I did for a while use a mobility cane. However, it was too long, then when someone had sawn off a piece it was too short. Also, it isn’t safe to use a mobility cane for me without also using my white cane and because of limited use of my left hand, I can’t use both. The adaptive equipment store does sell mobility canes with the white cane look, but these only have the advantage of making one recognizable as blind. They can’t be used for feeling around for obstacles. I could of course use a mobility cane with the white cane look in place of my white cane when walking sighted guide. However, I have learned to use my white cane for some support. The main reason I choose to use my white cane rather than a mobility cane with white cane look, however, is that I feel too self-conscious. I feel that I’m not mobility-impaired enough for this. I do wonder whether I’d feel more confident walking if I had a mobility cane, but I fear people will judge me for exaggerating my disability.

Back-to-School Memory

One of the prompts over at Mama’s Losin’ It is to describe a back to school memory. Usually, my first days at school were quite eventful, and not usually in a positive way.

I remember the day I started in seventh grade at a new school for the blind in 1998. It was my first time taking my laptop to school on a weird-looking troller, because I couldn’t carry the backpack myself. In elementary school, we’d all used braille typewriters. We started the school day with a talk from the principal, and then everyone went to their classrooms.

For my first class, we had computer education, for which we didn’t use our own laptops, since not everybody had one. In fact, I was the only one who had a laptop not provided by the school.

Our next class was either biology or English. We’ll say it was biology, and there, I had to use my computer. And it wouldn’t start up. I had my teacher take a look, but she couldn’t figure out the problem either. Neither could my English teacher for the next hour. I had an utter meltdown, fearing i’d ruined my entire school experience because I couldn’t even figure out my own computer. As I usually do, I refused every opportunity at finding a solution, such as my taking my schoolwork home to do it once my parents had figured out the problem. I was in total panic.

As it turned out when I got home, my parents had set a password on my computer which they hadn’t told me, and had forgotten to have my computer bypass the password upon startup. They’d set the password to prevent teachers from doing stuff with my computer they weren’t supposed to, and they hadn’t told me for fear I’d let it slip off my tongue.

Recently, I related this story to my husband, who is quite computer savvy. He got a post-secondary certificate in computing at age twelve, so he knew a bit about the computers of the late 1990s. He told me that the way my parents had set up the password was not a safeguard anyway.

I have had countless more back to school experieneces ever since and many more bad experiences with computers at school. Once I went to a mainstream secondary school in 1999, I was lucky to have my father work in computers there. At least, I was lucky when my computer acted up. I wasn’t so lucky when I acted up, because inevitably my father would find out.

Mama’s Losin’ It

Positives for the Week Starting February 23, 2015 #HappyDaysLinky

This week has been challenging. I’ve been very fatigued. This is nothing new as I’ve had terrible fatigue for a few months already. I also had a dizzy spell on Monday. Since my blood pressure was fine, there hasn’t been an obvious cause. I’m due to get blood drawn to check for hemoglobin and vitamin levels to see if either could explain the fatigue today.

On the old version of my Dutch blog, I used to post happy moments every now and then. Many other Dutch bloggers do this to focus on everyday enjoyment. I just found out that there’s a linky for this in English too. It’s the #HappyDaysLinky. So let me list some things that were good about this week.

1. Getting my braille display back. I got it back on Tuesday and was so relieved. I honestly hadn’t expected it back till later this week at the earliest. Since I hadn’t received a call from Freedom Scientific, the copany that manufactures them, I was expecting it to take much longer. I’m so glad the thing came back, so that I am now fully able to enjoy my online life again.

2. WiFi at the ward. Another thing that will enable me to enjoy my online life more, is that we got a WiFi connection at the psych unit I reside on. It won’t reach my room as the emitter is at the opposite end of the building, but I’ve been able to take my computer to the front room to enjoy the best signal. I don’t think I’ll be using the connection often except to download digital talking books, but it’s a good thing that it’s there.

3. Chocolate! I bought myself a box of chocolates on Monday and truly enjoyed them. Unfortunately, I ate a little too many and got sick, but that went away quickly.

4. Going for walks. The flu has stricken many of the nurses, so there’s usually fewer staff on my unit. That being said, I have been able to enjoy a few walks with the staff. I had a long walk with a substitute staff member on Sunday. Normaly staff can’t take patients on walks on week-ends because there is even fewer staffing, but apparently it was quiet enough on the ward that one could leave. Yesterday, I had to squeeze in art therapy between breakfast and going to the doctor for the fatigue. It was originally frustrating to have the art therapist arrive late, but I made up my mind that this was a great opportunity to go on a walk instead of doing actual art therapy. After all, by the time we’d reached the art therapy building, it’d almost be time to return to the unit for leaving for the doctor’s. I had a nice walk.

I am hoping next week will see at least as many happy moments. I heard the activity staff are introducing movement-focused activities in the day activity room across from my unit. I am looking forward to participating.

My goal for next week is to spend more me time. I hope to focus on writing and hope to also start yoga again. If not at day activities, then I hope to do it in my room.

What Katy Said

28 Before 28

It’s been a while since I wrote on this blog. I started up a Dutch blog again, and this time I hope that neither this blog nor the Dutch one suffers from my having two blogs. The reason I didn’t post for a while has nothing to do with the Dutch blog though. It’s to do with the fact that my braille display needed repairing and they took it into the shops for repairs rather than trying to fix the thing while I waited. This originally meant, or so I thought, that I couldn’t use the computer at all. Thankfully, I figured out the text-to-speech functionality and could do some Facebooking and blogging in Dutch. The synthesizer doesn’t do English though, so blogging here was out.

Even though I had over a week without blogging, I didn’t get lots of inspiration, because I couldn’t read the mostly English-language posts I usually get my inspiration from. I am determined to write though, so I’m going with Ginny Marie’s spin cycle prompt. The prompt is “28 things”. I originally thought about taking the easy way out and writing 28 random facts about myself, but then I realized I am 28 right now. Therefore, I choose to write 28 things I did before turning 28. Not all of these are truly achievements I made, but oh well.


  1. Went to three different elementary schools and two secondary schools. Graduated high school in 2005.

  2. Learned three foreign languages (English, German and French) and Latin. Forgot all but English and a tiny bit of German.

  3. Taught myself calendar calculation.

  4. Went to a school prom. Once or maybe even twice.

  5. Had crushes on only three different people. All of them were unapproachable. I don’t know whether I could even call what I feel for my husband a crush.

  6. Went to college and university. I attended college for a year and university for all of two months.

  7. Took five college courses in psychology. Passed two, failed one and never took the test for two.

  8. Lived on my own. For three months, but I did it!

  9. Got married.

  10. Lived in four different cities/towns, three of which are in the province of Gelderland.

  11. Rented an apartment with my husband.

  12. Got two cats.

  13. Traveled to France, Germany, England, Switzerland, Italy and Russia.

  14. Had eight major surgeries, seven of which I had before the age of nine. The eighth was my eye surgery in 2013.

  15. Got my wisdom teeth and had them out.

  16. Was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome, borderline personality disorder and a host of other psychiatric conditons that I got dediagnosed with again.

  17. Was on at least a dozen different medications, ten of which were psychiatric medications.

  18. Had at least a dozen online journals and blogs.

  19. Was the owner for four or five Yahoo! E-mail groups and one Facebook group. None of them are currently active. Created another (also inactive) Facebook group and became a co-admin for a Yahoo! group and a Facebook group that are both active at age 28.

  20. Wrote a resume. Once. Because it was a college requirement.

  21. Spoke to two members of parliament in person. One came to my high school and the other came to the blindness rehabiliation center. Both were from the Christian party.

  22. Was a member of the Socialist Party.

  23. Voted for them only once and voted for two other parties, both on the left of the political spectrum.

  24. Participated in two debating contests representing my high school.

  25. Was a member of a children’s choir even though I cannot sing to save my life.

  26. Owned the DSM-5, the current edition of the psychiatric manual, even though it’s not in use in the Netherlands yet. Read most of it.

  27. Had twelve computers, three braille displays (and got my fourth one just after my 28th birthday) and four mobile phones. All of my computers were laptops and none of my cellphones were smartphones.

  28. Attempted to write my autobiography at least half a dozen times.

Valentine’s Day

Yesterday was Valentine’s Day. I didn’t get to write as I spent the afternoon and evening at my husband’s and the night rediscovering IRC chats. I didn’t know they are still active, or at least some of them, and I certainly didn’t know how to access them. Last time I tried, some years ago, I got some malware on my computer. Now I just went with a web client.

I honestly hadn’t expected my husband to come pick me up at all, since I thought he’d go visit a friend. I knew it was Valentine’s, but I didn’t think that was a big deal. But when I called on Friday because i’d badly screwed up my computer, he said he’d come and fix it.

We don’t really have Valentine’s Day traditions, or not that I know. I know in 2008, when my now husband had already told me he was in love but I hadn’t answered him yet, he sent me a card. It was really not a card, but a piece of paper brailled with some kind of sharp object in place of a slate and stylus. I couldn’t read it, but kept it on my nightstand for a few months at least anyway. Not really because I intended to, but it just happened.

Ironically, on the same day, I wrote this really embarrassing (for my husband, and probably it should be for me too) post on my old blog about my ideas about having a relationship. I’m not going to link to it, but it laid the foundation for the decisions we made early in our relationship, and possibly without that post, I wouldn’t have had the courage to enter a relationship. I just can’t express myself that well in direct contact, as the fact that I waited over a month to answer his E-mail about the post illustrates.

Each year for Valentine’s, I resolve to give my husband some special treat. Each year, I forget or get overwhelmed in the process. I remember probably in 2009 looking for somethign special and finding pepper-spiced dark chocolate online, but somehow not being able to order it. My husband on the other hand has given me chocolate probably actually every single Valentine’s. This year, they were chocolate flowers. Yummy! Maybe my husband being the romantic kind and me thanking him (on my blog!) has to be the tradition.

This year, in addition to my husband picking me up and giving me chocolate, we went to Domino’s to take out pizza. I didn’t even remember I’d told him I wanted to get pizza there someday, as we used to do sometimes when he still lived in the college dorm. It’d been on my mind recently too. I got one of my favorite pizzas, but no, not pepperoni this time.

One thing I hope won’t be a Valentine’s tradition is my husband having to fix my comptuer. He did, for which I’m hugely grateful. I just don’t want to make a tradition out of burdening him with my computer ignorance. Then again, I guess he’d be happy if I made a Valentine’s tradition out of it, if I just left it at that.

Mama’s Losin’ It

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Positives for the Week

One of my loom bracelets.

I am feeling a bit stressed out after my computer started acting up again – not as in it being broken, just as in having a hiccup. I am also missing out on inspiration for my #Mumslist post this week, because I haven’t been online much. I thought I’d put these two frustrations to good use and make a list of positives of the week.


  1. Made not just two but five loom bracelets this week. Am working on a sixth one. The above pic shows a bracelet I made for a nurse.
  2. With today being the exception, the weather has been quite nice over the past week.

  3. I reached my goal of going to the gym this week. Did buy candy more than once though. I did have a binge eating episode on Friday, but let’s just consider that a slip up.

  4. The nurses made delicious macaroni for us yesterday. Had a delicious ice cream on Tuesday.

  5. Both of my computers are usually fuctioning again.

  6. Made phone calls to my mother and sister. My sister, who earned her Master’s in history a few weeks ago, got word that she may be accepted into teacher education after all.

And here are my goals for the upcoming week.


  1. Make a Christmas card for a swap I’m on. Yeah, cardmakers make and sometimes swap Christmas cards all year.

  2. Start working on an art doll for a mixed media swap. I don’t really know what an art doll is, but one of the usual activity staff will be back from vacation this week so I can ask her for inspiration.

  3. Go to the gym again.

  4. Write one original blog post (so something other than Tuesday Ten, Word of the Week, etc.).


Have a nice week everyone!

Mums' Days

(Mostly) Screenless #WotW

On Tuesday evening, I wrote here on the blog that my husband can usually fix my computer. That same evening, someone from Freedom Scientific, the screen reader company, called to get into my computer through some kind of distance control, in the hopes of fixing a problem I’d been having for a few weeks, which my husband had been unable to fix and for which he’d blamed my screen reader. After the Freedom Scientific person fiddled with my computer for a bit, it was worse than it was before. She recommended system recovery, which my husband tried on Wednesday, but failed. He took my computer to his place to reinstall Windows.

Since I hadn’t been able to use my computer from Tuesday evening until last night, and I didn’t compensate for the lack of a computer with a smartphone (which I don’t own) or TV, this was largely a screenless week. It was less of a boredom-filled week than my week without Internet acccess last May. I am thankful for loom bands in this respect.

Thursday was actually the most boring day, because we had a rather weird activity staff. I need some help with the loom bands, although after almost a week of nearly fulltime practice, I can almost entirely make a fishtail without help – the only thing I haven’t figured out is how to attach the clip on one of the ends of the bracelet.

Anyway, the other clients and I spent Thursday morning in the room pretty much keeping busy by ourselves because the man had no clue what activities we were doing let alone how to help. Besides, he went on a 45-minute cig break – thankfully there were no clients who needed to be accompanied by staff at all times. After this hilarious if not frustrating morning at day activities, I decided not to return for the afternoon. Instead, I did go to the gym, which was one of my goals for the week anyway.

A nice nurse worked the evening shift and there was some extra staffing, so she offered to help me with the loom bands. We decided to make a loom band heart for my husband. Unfortunately, I fidgeted with it too much so that a band snapped shortly after the thing was finished. I hope this isn’t somehow symbolic.

Yesterday, my husband brought me both my new computer, the one on which Windows needed to be reinstalled, and the older one, for which he had to replace the keyboard. Unforutnately, the old one returned a weird error upon startup and I forgot the password to the new one, so I had to wait for my husband to finish his late shift at work at 11:30 PM to give me the password. Today, he also “fixed” the older one – it wasn’t broken. Yay for my husband and yay for two working computers!

The Reading Residence

Week of July 28 to August 3, 2014 #Mumslist

While looking at blogs I might want to subscribe to, I came across the lovely Mums’ Days by Hannah, and her fabulous linky Mums’ List. The linky is about all kinds of lists, but especially a list detailing your week both in real life and in blogging/social media. I love linkies and lists, so I badly wanted to participate, but wasn’t sure I could since I’m not a Mom. I left a comment aking this, but then saw the rules and figured out the answer by myself. So here goes

Real Life


  1. Spent a lot of time and energy on my computer, both working on it and trying to get it to work. My husband fixed some of the problems, but not all. Left a few calls with the screen reader company, because that appears to be the problem.

  2. Enjoyed time in the garden and outside in general. It’s been sunny all week. Had a BBQ on Thursday for my ward. It was crowdy and noisy as a DJ came to play music and a lot of people sang along. Not my favorite pastime, though the food was good.

  3. Made a lovely loom bracelt. Yes, I mentioned this on Friday, too, but I mention it again because my husband was able to snap the picture today and I really want to show it off. Made an attempt at starting another loom bracelet for a nurse over coffee today, but I’d better just spend my time drinking coffee or looming than both at the same time.

  4. Finally went to the gym again after skipping it for two weeks. Had quite a nice work-out.

  5. Managed to buy a lot less candy than I usually do, but got a bag of liquorice in exchange for another bracelet so still probably ate as much as I normally do (which is too much). We also had fries tonight, but the little step I’ve taken is finally being able to eat a normal size portion.

Loom Bracelet

Blogging and Social Media


  1. Not been blogging much this week. I really had to bribe myself to write.

  2. Discovered the lovely Headspace Perspective, a blog about premature birth, birth trauma and baby loss. Since I am the oldest surviving child of a mother pregnant several times before delivering me, and I’m a preemie, I felt a kind of connectedness even though I haven’t been in Leigh’s shoes.

  3. Got a lot of compliments on my bracelet in Facebook groups.

  4. Not looked at my blog or Twitter stats (I don’t have a Facebook page or Pinterest or whathaveyou). My blog stats are probably misleading as I had around ten spam comments from what appear to be different spammers yesterday and last night. I’ve enabled comment moderation for new commenters now.

Goals for the Upcoming Week


  1. Make two loom bracelets.

  2. Buy candy only once. Go to the gym once too.

  3. Study 100 pages of intro to psychology textbook.

  4. Write at least three blog posts.

Mums' Days

Patience #WotW

It’s been a long week. The week-end was a bit boring, as on Friday night, my computer suddenly caught a bug or one that had been there all along was activated. The startup screen suddenly wouldn’t work anymore, the screen would first turn purple and then black, and the computer wouldn’t shut down properly. My husband came around on Saturday to try to fix it. This is the newest of three semi-working laptops I own. The oldest still has Windows XP on it and has a broken Enter key. The middle one, I spilled tea over two weeks ago, destroying the keyboard and making the computer essentially useless. My husband has already ordered a new keyboard via eBay at his go-to laptop keyboard shop in Hong Kong, and I’m hoping that in a few weeks, I can use this laptop at least as a spare laptop again. The newest, this one, he could fix only partly. I now have most things I’ll need on a regular basis on my desktop, and the shutdown issue is solved. The screen still turns purple and black, and my husband found out it happened whenever my screen reader starts. Someone from Freedom Scientific, the screen reader company, will have a look on Tuesday.

In the meantime, my other hobby besides the computer that I can do mostly independently is looming. Unfortunately, I broke my loom last week Friday and, though I ordered a new one immediately, the stupid people at the online store first forgot to package it along with the other supplies I ordered, which I therefore did receive. Then, when I sent them an extremely formal E-mail asking them to send the loom, they replied with an E-mail almost in text speak, saying they’d resend it. Yesterday, I got an E-mail that they’d sent it to the wrong address and the recipient would forward it to me. The store has too cute supplies not to order there again.

With all this waiting, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that I choose “patience” as my word for the week. It’s only been as of yesterday that I can almost fully use my computer. On Tuesday, I ordered a cheap loom along with some lovely looming beads at one of my favorite online jewelry-making stores. It arrived this morning, and I’m so glad. After a little bit of experimenting with this loom, I figured out how to make a fishtail bracelet with beads on it. I chose butterflies and letter beads to form my name. Unfortunately, I don’t have a picture, but I must say the result is quite good. I am having a fulfilling day at last. Patience does pay off.

The Reading Residence
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