Keys: My Time on a Locked Psychiatric Unit #AtoZChallenge

Welcome to day 11 in the #AtoZChallenge of random reflections. The letter K is really hard for me. It was everytime I did this challenge. Somehow, each word that comes to mind starting with K doesn’t seem right. For example, the 397 journal writing prompts and ideas eBook says “Kindness”. In the A to Z of me I chose “Kids”, but I wrote about my childless life already. Now that I write this, something pops up in my mind. In 2016, when I did the A to Z of mental health, I posted among other things about “Keys”. Today, I am picking up this word and reflecting on my sixteen months on a locked psychiatric unit.

It was never intended by the psychiatrist who admitted me to hospital in 2007 that I go to the locked ward at all. However, the open ward was full at the time of my urgent admission, so I was placed on the locked ward. This was in my parents’ city and I only was there for a week-end. When I was transferred to my own city, I wasn’t even told what unit I’d be placed on, but I ended up on one of the two locked units. It was the “least restrictive” locked unit, which didn’t have real isolation rooms. It did have time-out rooms in which you could be locked up, which aren’t much better.

Two weeks into my stay, my doctor informed me that I could in his opinion transition to the open unit. He however soon made up his mind, as I had terrible meltdowns. This was in fact what kept me on the locked unit for sixteen months, because the open resocialization unit initially didn’t want me.

For the first three months of my hospital stay, I had almost no privileges, which meant that I could only leave the unit accompanied by an adult. These three months were a long time, considering that most people don’t even spend that long in a psychiatric hospital. In the grand scheme of things though, it sounds like a very short time. Within a month from getting some unaccompanied off-ward privileges, I had full privileges and they were never restricted again.

I didn’t really mind being on a locked unit, but it’s still pretty strange. I mean, now that I live independently, I still struggle to leave the house without someone else even to sit in the garden. This is in part due to my terrible orientation and mobility skills, but it may also be a form of continued institutionalization syndrome.

3 thoughts on “Keys: My Time on a Locked Psychiatric Unit #AtoZChallenge

  1. Wow, that was a long time. I never was on a locked unit as a patient, only on open units. I visited a friend once on the closed unit, and it was a completely different atmosphere.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh wow, 16 months! That’s really a lot. I’ve never been on a locked unit myself, but heard a lot of people’s stories so I can at least imagine how horrible it had to be for you.
    By the way, if you’d like to participate, I nominated you to 5 things I like about myself tag. I know you’re occupied with this challenge now, so don’t feel pressured and do it when you want and if you want. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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