My Experience with Professional Support for Autism #Write31Days

Yesterday’s post in #Write31Days was somewhat inspired by the day 3 question on the 30 Days of Autism Acceptance. The day 4 question asks about family and support. I may have to split this topic into several posts, as it is about both family and professional support. Today, I will talk about professional support.

I have been in the care system for years. As a child, I was in special education. As a teen, I didn’t get much in the way of professional support, but I sought it back out right after high school by going to a rehabilitation center for the blind. I was still undiagnosed at this point and I don’t think the staff had an idea that I could be autistic.

When I moved to an independence training home after the rehabilitaton program, the staff got to know me better and got the idea that I may “suffer from” autism. That was how the coordinator called it when she wrote my request for services for once I’d be living independently. I hated that word, “suffer”, but I’ll get to that at some later point.

Initially, the reason my staff wanted me to be assessed for autism was to confirm they were on the right track with their support approach. Obviously they weren’t, as they kept switching approaches and expecting little from me one day, then deciding all my challenging behaivor was attention-seeking and leaving me pretty much to my own rsources the next.

I was diagnosed with autism in March of 2007 and started meeting with a community psychiatric nurse (CPN) in training in April. Her supervisor was a bit of a weirdo, barely having read my records and making his own assumptions about what was going on with me. He was the first to mention impulse control disorder, which I got to be diagnosed with along with autism a year later.

The CPN-in-training herself was great. She gave me lots of coping tools, even though I didn’t fully understand the necessity at first. Unfortunately, as I was moving cities to go to univeristy, I had to stop seeing her three months later.

After being hospitalized, my interactions with nurses and treatment providers were quite varied. I had favorite and not-so-favorite nurses on each unit I stayed on. Particularly, my named nurse on the resocialization unit was great. So was the head nurse at that unit, who acted as a step-in named nurse to me too.

What I found the most helpful in a nurse, was if they took the time to really look at my needs rather than at protocols. That was clearly what I missed most at the last unit I stayed on. “Borderlines need to take responsibility,” a nurse – who later became one of my favoirte nurses at that unit – told me when I requested reminders to do my personal care tasks. I know that it wasn’t just that most staff didn’t believe I’m autistic, since they treated another patient with a more established autism diagnosis in a similarly dismissive way.

Now that I’m home, I think most of my staff do a good job of balancing protocols, which of course they have to adhere to, with meeting my needs. For example, my current CPN just reassured me this afternoon that she validates my need to be in a sensory group at day activities. She didn’t even say it’s not in line with my intelligence level.

My home support and day activities staff are great. My husband says it’s a regional thing. It isn’t, because the other day activity place I checked out and the mental health agency’s home support team, both of which are in the same city where I get my day activites, weren’t as accommodating at all.

2 thoughts on “My Experience with Professional Support for Autism #Write31Days

  1. Challenging behaviour – not attention-seeking.

    Attention is only one of the four behaviourist functions. Escape and sensory needs should have been at least two. As well as social needs.

    [And infinite humanistic functions – and more than functions].

    So good you are pursuing a sensory diet/nurturing programme, Astrid. These can too often be neglected. I am thinking the DSM-5 is helpful in this too as this was finally recognised – albeit under “repetitive restricted and circumscribed interests” as the “part 2”.

    Reassurance and validation are great to have in your life from your professional supports as well as your personal ones. Currently I am reading Ken Pope and his practice:

    http://childmyths.blogspot.com/2017/09/how-do-you-know-if-your-childs.html

    And it is good you pointed out you were in the care system since you were a child.

    I appreciate the named nurse system in the Netherlands social care system/psychiatric care system [one is a subset of the other, yes? I do remember your long Social Care series on your blog].

    Now to this:

    As a teen, I didn’t get much in the way of professional support, but I sought it back out right after high school by going to a rehabilitation center for the blind. I was still undiagnosed at this point and I don’t think the staff had an idea that I could be autistic.

    When I moved to an independence training home after the rehabilitaton program, the staff got to know me better and got the idea that I may “suffer from” autism. That was how the coordinator called it when she wrote my request for services for once I’d be living independently. I hated that word, “suffer”, but I’ll get to that at some later point.

    Co-ordinators. They can ask: “Who is the challenge to? Who is suffering here? Who is under labour?” And they also use it as a little red tick/check or a post-it note.

    Like

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