Diagnonsense Once Again

A few weeks ago, I wrote about my disappointment at not finding the right day activities or home support. Unfortunately, it didn’t end there. Over the past few weeks, I have been finding out about the details of my changing diagnosis. Or rather, diagnonsense, as it’s all extremely odd. Let me explain.

In late June, my psychologist pulled me out of day activities to inform me she had changed my descriptive diagnosis. A descriptive diagnosis is a brief description of what’s wrong with the patient, which should be a little more personalized than the patient’s DSM-IV (we still use DSM-IV here, which is weird enough) classification. Her descriptive diagnosis was mostly okay’ish, with one exception: she said that autism as well as dissociative identity disorder and PTSD had been previously diagnosed, but these weren’t too clear. At first, I thought she meant just the DID/PTSD wasn’t clear. I was wrong. She had, in fact, removed autism from my diagnosis.

Now I have been assessed for autism three times in the past and was diagnosed with it all these three times. There were some questions as to whether some of my problems are due to blindness, but overall it was clear that there was more that was going on with me and this “more” is most likely somewhere along the autism spectrum.

I however was also born prematurely and had a brain bleed leading to hydrocephalus (“water-on-the-brain”) as a baby. This was known to all people who previously diagnosed me as autistic and my first diagnostician even added hydrocephalus to axis III (for physical health problems) of my DSM-IV classification. This was when I was in outpatient treatment. For some reason, hydrocephalus was never on axis III while I was hospitalized. It still isn’t. Yet my psychologist says she cannot diagnose autism because of the complications associatedd with my premature birth. Never mind that there is an enormous amount of literature showing that former preemies and children with infantile hydrocephalus are more likely to be autistic than those without these experiences.

Now like I said, my psychologist didn’t add hydrocephalus, neonatal brain injury or anything like that to my diagnosis. She did briefly mention it in my descriptive diagnosis, but it’s your DSM-IV diagnosis which determines your “diagnosis-treatment combination”, ie. what care you’ll get. My DSM-IV classification now lists borderline personality disorder as my diagnosis. Oh and adjustment disorder, which my psychologist says explains why I can’t handle changing situations. It doesn’t. An adjustment disorder is an extreme, disabling response to an identified stressor. For example, when I lived independently and this caused me to land in crisis, I was diagnosed with adjustment disorder to justify my hospitalization. Back then, adjustment disorder was a justified cause for care under the basic (mandatory) insurance pacakage. It no longer is. Long story short: essentially, I’m stuck with just a borderline personality disorder diagnosis to base my care on. It doesn’t seem to matter that BPD is an adult-onset disorder and I’ve had problems all my life. It doesn’t seem to matter that BPD doesn’t explain my sensory and cognitive overload. Oh wait, maybe that’s just me trying to manipulate people into not exercising their right to overload me.

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2 thoughts on “Diagnonsense Once Again

  1. Are the diagnosis listed just for insurance purposes to cover? Does she in conversation agree to the autism or is it just on paper as listed for insurance documentation?

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