T – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

Welcome to the letter T post in the #AtoZChallenge on mental health. I’m a little late once again to publish this post, because this was a hard letter and I have once again been very tired. Here goes.

Transition

Transition or transfer happens when a patient moves from one setting into another. This could be from an acute unit to a rehabilitation, resocialization or long-term care unit. It could also be from a psychiatric unit into supported housing or community care.

Trauma

Like I said yesterday, many psychiatric patients have endured some form of trauma. Trauma is experienced differently by different people. The diagnostic manual defines trauma for the purpose of diagnosing post-traumatic stress disorder as having endured, been confronted with or witnessed a situation that is life-threatening, threatened or actually caused physical harm, or sexual violation. Starting with DSM-5, it is made explicit that being confronted with such a situation through the media does not count. As such, people who for exampe watched the 9/11 terrorist attacks on TV (ie. virtually the whole world) cannot claim to have been traumatized by it. First responders who witnessed the events themselves, of course, can. So can people who lost loved ones in the terrorist attacks.

Please note that this definition is only used for the purpose of diagnosing PTSD. People can be diagnosed with another stressor-related disorder (eg. adjustment disorder with PTSD features) if their experience does not meet the criteria for trauma but is still distressing.

Treatment Planning

Treatment plans, like I explained when discussing care plans, describe the person’s overall treatment and diagnosis. On long-term psychiatric units, treatment plans are revised every six months or so. A patient has the right to contribute to their treatment plan and to review it, but on my unit, during the actual meeting, patients are not in attendance. I have only been asked to contribute once and am lucky if I know when my treatment plan revision is. Obviously, informal patients (and most patients on a section) must consent to their treatment plan before it can be implemented. In reality though, I’ve not seen my treatment plan in years so I think consent is automatically assumed.

3 thoughts on “T – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

    1. Well, no. Unless someone not receiving treatment would harm that person or others, consent is a basic right. Some people can’t give consent due to for example a severe intellectual disability. In that case, a mentor is appointed who makes decisions in the best interest of that person. This is often a family member and cannot be a care/treatment provider.

      Liked by 1 person

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