R – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

Welcome to the #AtoZChallenge on mental health, day 18. Today’s letter is R. Enjoy.

Recovery

Recovery is the patient-led process of learning to live a fulfilling life with or beyond one’s mental illness. It may mean overcoming one’s mental health problems, but recovery is also for people with lifelong mental illness. It is related to rehabilitation, which I’ll discuss below, but recovery is led by patients.

Like I said when discussing experience and jobs, I have participated in a recovery group. In these groups, people discuss different topics related to getting their lives on track. For example, we discuss sources of support, pitfalls in our recovery, our relation with our treatment providers, etc.

Rehabilitation

Rehablitation is the staff-led process of helping patients live a meaningful life with or beyond their mental illness. Rehabilitation has the patients’ wishes in mind but still is led by staff. It is a common belief, and I’m not entirely sure whether this is correct or not, tht rehabilitation is linked to resocialization, which I’ll discuss hereafter. As such, a patient’s wishes might only be the focus of staff support if they flow towards independence.

Resocialization

Resocialization is the process of going back to a less restrictive treatment setting or back into the community after institutional treatment. It may also refer to independence-focused training in general. Resocialization units in psychiatric hospitals usually allow patients to stay there for a specific time period, usually two years. Rehabilitation units in long-term care may be focused on further independence too, but they have more flexible guidelines on how long a person can stay there.

Restraint

Restraint is the physical, mechanical or chemical restriction of a person’s movement. Holding someone down or tying someone onto a bed are often recognized as restraint, but giving a person a high dose of an antipsychotic or benzodiazepine to tranquilize them is a form of restraint too. Restraint, like seclusion, can only be used to avert the patient being a danger to themself or others. In the Netherlands, mechanical restriants are hardly ever used in psychiatric hospitals. They were up till recently commonly used in nursing homes on patients with dementia who run a risk of falling, but I believe regulations have changed on this. Chemical restraints are still used, though not as often here as in other countries.

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