P – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

Welcome to day 16 in the #AtoZChallenge on mental health. Todays’letter is P. There ae many obvious mental health terms starting with P, but also some you may not know.

Privileges

Privileges are what freedom of independence and movement someone has while in the mental hospital. In Believarexic, the book by J.J. Johnson I read a few months ago, the main character rightfully says that what are called privileges in the mental hospital are basic rights in the real world. For example, every adut in the real world is allowed to shower independently, whereas some people in mental hospitals need to do such basic tasks under staff supervision.

Of course, restrictions to someone’s freedom even in the mental hospital need to be motivated. If a person isn’t a danger to themself or others, they should really be allowed to go wherever they want unless this is a hindrance to their treatment. What I mean by this is of course even a person with full privileges should show up for their treatment appointments. Usually, even people with full privileges need to ask for permission from their clinician to leave the hospital overnight.

Psychiatrist

A psychiatrist is a medical doctor specializing in mental illnesses. NOwadays, they’re commonly seen as human pill dispensers, because prescribing medication is their primary task. However, in the Netherlands every psychiatrist is also a qualified psychotherapist. A psychiatrist is usualy a person’s head clinician. Head clinicians are the only ones who can open diagnosis-treatment combinations in the Netherlands. Diagnosis-treatment combination is insurance lingo for the patient’s diagnosis and the treatment that is suited to that diagnosis according to protocols. As such, a head clinician is the only one who can change a patient’s formal diagnosis. By the way, clinical psychologists and psychotherapists can also be head clinicians.

Psychologist

Psychologists do most of the talk therapy part of mental health treatment. There are three levels of psychologists employed by mental health agencies in the Netherlands. Basic psychologists are fresh out of college with a Master’s degree in psychology. We have a basic psychologist employed at my unit but I’m clueless as to what his duties are. Anyone can call themself a psychologist. Then there is the health care psychologist, which is in fact a protected title. Only someone who has completed two years of additional trainign after college and is licensed can call themself a health care psychologist. This is the most common type of psychologists employed by mental health agencies. They can do basic psychotherapy but cannot be head clinicians. Last are cliniical psychologists, who’ve got two more years of specialized training and many also have a Ph.D. These people can be head clinicians and do more specialized psychotherapy too. Clinical psychologists are often assigned to the more complex cases. My unit currently does not employ a clinical psychologist.

Psychotherapy

There are many forms of psychotherapy, both individual and in a group. Psychotherapy usually employs talking to help the patient recover, though some psychotherapies are partly non-verbal too. In many countries, the term psychotherapist can be used by anyone who so desires. Not so in the Netheraldns: psychotherapists are psychologists who’ve had I believe it’s four years of training in psychotherapy techniques. They are bound by the same laws as doctors and health care and clinical psychologists. A psychiatrist is registered separately as a physician and as a psychotherapist. As such, they can lose one license but keep the other. I once read about a psychiatrist who mostly practised psychotherapy and due to abuse of power lost his license, but only his physician license at first.

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