B – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

Welcome to my letter B post in the #AtoZChallenge on mental health. This is a much harder letter than A was, but I still found some interesting terms in mental health starting with the letter B.

Behavior

Behavior is defined on Wikipedia as “the range of actions or mannerisms by individuals in conjunciton with themselves or their enviornment”. Well, it does not include just individuals, but also animals, artificial entities, etc., but the full definition is way too complex to go into here. The bottom line is that behavior includes all actions a person (or animal, artificial entity, etc.) conducts in interaction with themselves or their environment. Everyone exhibits behavior, sometimes not even consciously.

In mental health care, however, “behavior” has a different meaning. It refers not to everything a person does, but to specific actions that are supposed to say something about their mental health. “Behavior” then becomes a sign of mental illness. Worse yet, when a mental nurse says something is “behavioral”, they usually mean it’s willful. “That’s behavior”, is a mental nurse-ism for “you are willfully acting inappropriately”.

Biomedical Model

This is the model which sees illness as a direct result of dysfunction in the body. The biomedical model, when applied to mental illness, sees mental illness as purely a chemical imbalance or a brain disease. Proponents of the biomedical model use only medications or other biological interventions (eg. brain surgery) to treat mental illness. There are hardly any doctors who subscribe exclusively to the biomedical model, especially in mental illness.

Bipolar Disorder

Also known as manic-depressive disorder, this disorder is characterized by alternating episodes of major depression and mania. Mania is a state of elation where a person is overly active, reckless and impulsive and/or irritable. Some people in a manic phase spend thousnads of dollars they don’t have on things they don’t need. Bipolar disorder is not about mood swings. Rather, the depressive or manic phases last for at least a week for mania and two weeks for depression, often longer. Some people in manic states experience psychosis too. Then we get the well-known delusion of gandeur. Please note that being convinced you are Napoleon does not make you bipolar per se. Bipolar mania, as I said, also includes increased activity, impulsivity and irritability.

Borderline Personality Disorder

I have this diagnosis and it’s really one of the most misunderstood mental illnesses by mental health professionals. The lay perception (and perception by some professionals) of BPD is one of a woman who threatens suicide when a friend doesn’t answer the phone within five seconds. She has one boyfriend after another, with whom she picks fights then five minutes later makes love. She doesn’t show up for therapy appointments, but demands her therapist make time for her whenever she does show up, then when they refuse she runs in front of a slow-moving car saying she’s going to kill herself. That last one was a true example from my psychology textbook, seirously.

Surprise: this is not what BPD is like in most cases. Firstly, BPD occurs almost as often in men as in women but is underdiagnosed in men and overdiagnosed in women. Secondly, BPD is characterized by emotion regulation difficulties, which means a person’s emotions can shift rapidly. People with BPD often do engage in self-injurious or suicidal behavior. They also have an intense fear of abandonment, which leads some to fall in and out of love very rapidly. Borderlines do outwardly look like they are manipulative bitches sometimes, but inwardly, they suffer tremendously from their rapidly shifting emotions. They do not demand excessive attention per se (like people with histrionic personality disorder do) Learn more about what it’s like to suffer from BPD.

On long-term mental units, you don’t see many people with BPD, because standards of care dictate they can only be admitted very briefly for crisis intervention. Us borderlines are supposed to get dependent otherwise. Well, I can tell you, I know people with other diagnoses who are much more dependent than I am.

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8 thoughts on “B – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

  1. Thank you for clearing it out. I often hear about it but didn’t quite understand what does it mean. You have explained what Bipolar Disorder is in so simple and concise manner. Thank you.

    Like

  2. As someone with BPD I really appreciated your breakdown and comparison of the typical behaviors. That textbook example was ridiculous! Nice post, thanks!

    Like

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