A – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

Welcome to the #AtoZChallenge on mental health. I discussed many topics related to mental health already last October for #Write31Days. As I menitoned in my theme reveal post for the #AtoZChallenge, I’m going to give short descriptions of several words for each letter (sometimes though I have only one). For today, my letter A post, I have quite a lot of words. Here goes.

Acute unit


Also called “admission unit” in the Netherlands, here is where people go if they’re in crisis. The acute unit is for short-term treatment only: up to three months. Even so, some people stay there much longer. Like, I spent sixteen months on an acute ward because the rehabilitation unit didn’t want me.

Addiction

Though addictions are typically treated in separate units or even by separate agencies than mental illnesses, many people with a mental health diagnosis also have an addiction.

Admission

The process of getting admitted to a psychiatric unit. If people are admitted to an acute unit, this is usually through the crisis service or psychiatric liaison in the emergency department. On treatment units, such as for eating disorders or personality disorders, people usually get admitted through their outpatient treatment team. An admission interview typically consists of a brief assessment of one’s symptoms and some standard questions (eg. does the patient know where they are and what date it is). Details of the patient’s initial treatment may also be discussed.

Aggression

Aggression is quite common among mentally ill people, especially those in inpatient care. This may not be a politically correct statement but it’s true. Most times, this consists of verbal aggression, but nurses and patients sometimes get attacked physically too.

Alcohol

Alcoholism is not as common among mentally ill people in inpatient treatment – they often take their addictions out on other drugs. However, still you get the occasional alcoholic on an inpatient mental health unit. Most instituttions don’t serve alcohol in the cafeteria, though near my institution is the railroad store where they do sell alcohol.

Attention-Seeking

Us mentals are supposed to crave attention more than do people without mental illness, hence the common belief that a mental illness is “attention-seeking” behavior. Well, let me tell you: mentally ill people often keep their symptoms hidden for a long time and most don’t crave attention more than do mentally healthy people.

Attitude

A similar myth about mental illness is that it’s an attitude problem. It’s not. I wrote a post on mental illness and attitude last October. The idea that mental illness is an attitude problem is very damanging to people with mental illness, who often have a lot of shame as is. There is a group of people wiht an attitude problem here and they’re the people who think they can judge another person’s attitude like this.

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13 thoughts on “A – #AtoZChallenge on Mental Health

  1. I commend your courage to address an issue so carelessly misunderstood or (worse) tragically dismissed. Your thoughtful candor will enlighten (as well as remind) many to the everyday perils faced by otherwise ordinary people. Well done!

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  2. I will say that alcohol can exacerbate a lot of the symptoms of mental illness, however. My roommate had a lot of mental health concerns, and she ended up stopping drinking alcohol after a particularly violent incident one night because she realized that it made her feel worse and often didn’t recognize herself when she drank.

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