Breakdown: My Crisis of 2007 #Write31Days

31 Days of Mental Health

Welcome to day 30 in the #Write31Days challenge on mental health. Today, I discussed the details of the mental crisis that I had in 2007 with a nurse. This helped me feel heard but it also was a bit unsettling. I vividly remember many of the details. I feel compelled to share my story here, but I don’t know how safe a public blog on the Internet is to do so. I shared the details in a post on my old blog (which can still be more easily found by googling my name than this blog) about a month after the crisis happened. I published the raw story back then, complete with every detail of where I was and what I did. I edited it more than a year later for fear it’d ruin my chances of ever having a normal life. If future employers (of which I think I’ll have none) ever read that I’m a nut case and spent eight years in a mental institution, they’ll reject me no matter how vividly I describe the crisis that led to said institutionalization. That being said, the original story was quite badly written. I don’t want to read even the edited version now. I’ll just share what I feel like sharing now.

I remember the crisis state started right after daylight saving time ended on October 28, 2007. Of course, I was spiraling down into crisis from the moment I started livign on my own in August and I had a minor crisis about once a week. The week of October 29, I started completley losing my mind. I wandered about in the dark each evening. The police took me to the police station a couple of times that week and called the crsis service, but they couldn’t do anything.

In the afternoon of October 31, I was called by the crisis service. I still remember the name of the crisis service nurse calling me and if I ever run into her again, which is unlikely, I’m not going to be pleased. She told me that I just had to find ways to distract myself and that a hospitalization would mean I needed to go back on medication. (I’d quit an antipsychotic three weeks prior. No-one later on drew the connection.) I didn’t care about going on medication one way or the other, but I couldn’t mutter a proper response.

On November 1, I took a trip to my parents’ city to collect a landline phone. I don’t have a clue why I had to sleep over there for a night just to collect a phone. On the way back to my city the next day, I had a huge meltdown. This wasn’t unusual for me when returning to my city from my parents’, but for the first time, the railroad service employee who was assisting me to get on the train back to my city, called the police. I hardly realized I was speaking to the police when they told me to leave the station. I wasn’t sure what to do at first, so wandered around. I remember somoene, no clue who, told me that if I could behave, I could come back to the station and get on the train to my city.

I decided to go to the training home which I’d been a client of before going into independent living. I was allowed in, but once the staff found out the police had been called on me, they asked me to leave. I can’t remeber what I did throughout the afternoon. I was supposed to have an early train, but didn’t end up in my ultimate crisis till 8:00 PM. I remember getting some French fries at a cafeteria near the training home and calling my independent livign support worker that I’d forgotten to pay my rent for November the day before.

A housemate from the training home offered me to stay with her for the night so that we could find a solution the next morning. The staff went into her apartment and told me to leave. They initially gave me some time, but I left instantly and had the hugest breakdown I’ve ever had. I was hardly aware of my surroundings as I told some people’s voicemails that I was going to commit suicide. I inferred the time from what the bus driver, on whose bus I’d embarked, told the police. It was the 8:01 PM bus around the eastern part of the city (in that city, buses go in circular routes or at least they did back then).

I was taken to the police station by the police again. This time I was in my parents’ city so the route to crisis services was even longer. The police had to call a community physician who was the most umempahtetic jerk of a doctor I’d met by that time. (I later was treated by an authoritarian psychiatric resident, but she never had to talk to me in the midst of a crisis.) The doc told me I was making people feel responsible. While I can see eight years on that he was right, I couldn’t grasp this back then. I don’t remember my response. The community physician called the crisis service. I have recurrent dreams about the psychiatrist, the only one whose name I remember. In my dreams, I run into her again as I get treated at the mental health agency near the tiny village I’m moving to.

I am a million times thankful that this psychiatrist didn’t stick the BPD diagnosis on me, even though in retrospect my crisis could be interpreted as a typical BPD thing. Instead, she talked to me – she showed much more empathy than the community physician and eventually labeled me with adjustment disorder, which basically means an extreme response to stress. She suggested I be admitted and right away clarified that a suitable living solution would need to be found for me while I was in the hospital. No-one could’ve known back then that it’d take eight years and I’d be going to live independently once again after that.

Post Comment Love

One thought on “Breakdown: My Crisis of 2007 #Write31Days

  1. As always Astrid I admire your courage in sharing your story. You are such a brave lady and I am so impressed by your honesty. I hope that anyone going through a similar situation finds this post and that it helps them. Sorry I am late visiting and thank you for linking to #PoCoLo x

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s