Autistic Adults and Independence

I skipped a day of the September blog challenge because I was at my parents’. I had a good time. Today I came down with a cold, so am not really in the mood for writing, but I’ve got to keep up with the blog anyway. Besides, I just have to write my own spin on autism and independence, which Pam Byrne wrote an interesting post on.

Pam is the mother of an autistic adult with signifcant care needs. Though I am probably more capable in some ways than Pam’s son Alex, I am an autistic adult with significant care needs. I used to also be an autistic advocate, fighting for the rights to proper care and services for autistic adults. I always said autistics should be allowed to live and work in the community. It took myself being institutionalized to learn that society isn’t prepared for that. Of course, we should fight to get society prepared, but not every autistic person or parent of an autistic person has the resources and time and energy to do so. I bet most do not.

I remember back in 2010 or 2011 reading some research that said most autistic people attain a relatively normal level of independence, but do so around ten years later than most neurotypical people. I do not remember whether the research included autistics with co-existing intellectual disability or other additional needs. Even if it did, there still will be a significant number of autistic adults who do not reach expected levels of independence. For example, as Pam also says, the unemployment rate among autistics is about 70 to 80 percent. You could again put this down to discrimination. I won’t. After all, even the most willing employer could not employ me.

Maybe if I’d gotten early autism intervention, I would’ve been more independent than I am now. Maybe. Maybe not. Maybe it wouldn’t have made a significant difference, because my biggest problem is not a lack of practical skills. It is the fact that it’s not safe for me to be without access to support.

Of course, we need to teach autistic children and adults the skills to become the best they they can be. However, there are some skills some autistic people will just not learn. We could advocate for more applied behavior analysis training for older children and even adults with autism. I won’t. I don’t have the energy to go into all the things that are worng with ABA. Let me just say that I for one am completely overwhelmed with intensive skills training. Instead, we need enough supports to make sure autistic people can live a fulfilling, satisfying life.

Everyday Gyaan
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7 thoughts on “Autistic Adults and Independence

  1. I believe your voice is needed. I want to read more of your story. I also hope you will link up at Literacy Musing Mondays to share with us your journey. Would you be willing to write a guest post for me about autism, literacy, and learning. Such a post will resonate with my readers. Let me know. My email is marykatbpcsc45 at gmail.com

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  2. I have a brother in law with autism; he is in his mid 50’s. I blog about him from time to time. He is not interested in all in using a computer. He is verbal, but has great difficulty in expressing himself. There was no early intervention for him either; and services for adults are so lacking in many parts of the United States – and support is lacking for the ones who love them.

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  3. You make an important point about the importance of both advocacy for and education of people with autism. Thanks for adding this post to DifferentDream.com’s Tuesday link up.

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