Book Review: Beyond Magenta by Susan Kuklin

As I said when I wrote my summer reading list, I have been wanting to read Beyond Magenta by Susan Kuklin (2014) ever since I discovered it. I finally got down to finishing it this week.

Beyond Magenta is a series of interviews with transgender or genderqueer teens. There are interviews with two trans girls, two trans guys and two people who identify as something inbetween male and female (genderqueer, genderfluid or as one of them calls it, genderfuck). One of the genderqueer teens is also intersex. They have polycystic ovary syndrome, which I until reading their story didn’t know is an intersex condition, since most people with PCOS are thought of as female.

I think I know quite a bit about gender diversity for someone who is thought of as and identifies as female (cisgender). Even so, I learned some new things about trans and genderqueer issues, some of which I now see as quite basic. For example, as is apparent in many of the stories, gender identity has little to do with sexual orientation. It only has to do with it in that many trans people start out identifying as gay or lesbian before they realize they’re truly straight but trans. It is interesting in this sense that many of the people interviewd found that their parents or friends were okay with them being gay or lesbian, but not with them being trans.

The teens interviewed in this book faced a variety of reactions to their gender identity. Some were also totally cool with themselves from the start while others faced significant depression. Of course, in order to want to be interviewed for a book on trans issues, even anonymously, you need to have come to terms with your gender identity to an extent. For example, Mariah, who insisted on being pseudonymized, calls herself not a success story, but she still appears quite confident. This could of course be a façade.

Overall, I liked learning about teens’ trans and genderqueer experiences through Beyond Magenta. The book wasn’t written in some kind of inspirational, oh-look-at-that kind of way, or at least I didn’t perceive it as such. Kuklin did a nice job allowing each teen to express themselves as they wanted.

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7 thoughts on “Book Review: Beyond Magenta by Susan Kuklin

  1. Cool! Thanks for the review! Wish I had known about this book last year when I had a transgender at my middle school! It would help to let him/her know that he/she is not alone. Maybe I will meet some more. 🙂

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  2. I’m definitely going to have to read this. I love anything that shows people who are perceived as ‘different’ have all of the same issues and fears that we do. They may see or feel some things differently but when it comes down to it, we’re all just people.Thanks so much for this review, Astrid!

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