Halloween or St. Martin: My Experience (Includes Social Story)

This week’s spin cycle prompt is to write about your Halloween. Since we don’t celebrate Halloween much here in the Netherlands, and I certainly didn’t do anything for it this year, I have a hard time telling you about my Halloween specifically. We do have a similar celebration though, St. Martin, which is celebrated on NOvember 11. On St. Martin, kids go from door to door as on Halloween, only they carry a lantern and aren’t dressed up. They sing a St. Martin’s song and then get a treat.

I did follow a lot of Halloween-related posts over the past few weeks, and one was a Halloween-based social story (unfortunately, I forgot where I found it). For those not familiar with them, social stories are like little tales you tell kids with social-cognitive difficulties such as autism so that they know what to expect and how to behave in certain situations. They often include both written “instructions” and pictures. Reading this social story reminded me of my own most embarrassing St. Martin’s experience, when I could most definitely have used a social story.

I was about thirteen, which I think is way old for trick-or-treating, but my classmates were still going too and so was my younger sister. None of my classmates lived in my neihgborhood and my sister didn’t want me to go with her and her friends. I went alone, which was hard enough given that I’m blind and couldn’t always find the doorbell. However, the embarrassing thing was that, though I did start going from door to door at the same time my sister did, being alone, I had no clue when to return home. So at one point I had been trick-or-treating for I don’t know how long and I rang the umpteenth doorbell, and someone told me that I was way late and should be home by now. That sure was embarrassing!

Most Halloween-based social stories are catered towards younger children who can’t go from door to door independently, so they include stuff like “I will hold Mommy’s hand”. I realize however that for special needs kids especially, it may still be good to participate in Halloween or similar festivities when they’re older. Here is a St. Martin’s social story for those old enough to walk the neighborhood independently. You can modify the traditions and date to make it Halloween-based.

It is November 11, which is St. Martin. On St. Martin, kids go from door to door singing a song in exchange for candy. After dinner at 6:45, I get my lantern and get ready to go from door to door. I go outside at 7:00 and make sure to take my lantern and a bag for the candy I’ll get. I ring the neighbors’ doorbells. When they open the door, I show my lantern and sing one of the St. Martin’s songs I’ve been taught. Then the neighbors give me candy. I go to the neighbors in my own street only and finish off no later than 7:30. I am home no later than 7:45. I get to choose and eat one piece of candy tonight. St. Martin sure is a treat-filled celebration!

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5 thoughts on “Halloween or St. Martin: My Experience (Includes Social Story)

  1. Thanks for sharing this story. I celebrate “All Hallows’ Eve” with my kids as the day before All Saints’ Day. My teenager collects canned goods through her high school community service program called “Treat the Hungry.”

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  2. Thank you for sharing your holiday! For Halloween, we celebrate “All Hallows’ Eve” as the day before “All Saints’ Day.” My teenager in high school collects canned goods to fill the homeless food pantry. They call it “Treat the Hungry” and get the whole school involved.

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  3. I used social stories all the time when I taught 8 year olds, for my student with Asperger’s. Now I use them to teach preschoolers how to trick-or-trick, and also not to be scared of costumes. Some of the Halloween costumes and decorations can be pretty scary for little kids!

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