Preemie #WotW

As I said on Friday, I’ve been pondering my premature birth a lot lately. This week I’ve been pondering it so much that I’ll choose “preemie” as my word of the week. For those who don’t know, I’m myself a preemie, not a parent of one. This brings about some unique challenges that I’ll share below.

Being a preemie, I am a statistical survivor – I “beat the odds”. Back in 1986 when I was born, it was the era of infinite possibilities for neonatology, and doctors were treating and keeping alive whoever they could. That’s changed. In 2001, I became aware of the fact that in the Netherlands, preemies born at under 25 weeks gestation, are not treated. It isn’t that the doctors here can’t – they’re probably as capable as doctors in the United States, where 23- and 24-weekers are treated and surviving regularly. Rather, doctors here believe that the quality of life of preemies born at under 25 weeks, would be too poor. My treating neonatologist, Dr. Willem Fetter, was quoted several times in newspapers as saying that sometimes he meets a former preemie and thinks: “What have we done?!”

This sentiment does not seem to be confined to the Netherlands. As Sue Hall says in For the Love of Babies, neonatologists no longer have an urgent need to save everyone they can. In the U.S., however, parents have a say.

I was born in 1986, in the era of infiinite possibilities. When, after I suffered a severe brain bleed, my parents questioned my quality of life, Dr. Fetter bluntly informed them that the staff were keeping me alive and not to interfere. I at one point read an article on abortion survivors, and it included the statistical survivors, living in areas where many abortions take place or for example those with Down Syndrome, but also the “wanted survivors”. Wanted survivors were those whose parents contemplated aborting them but ultimately didn’t. I can very strongly identify with the “wanted survivor” statement, because, even though my parents had no choice to keep me alive or not, they did eventually have a choice to raise me or not, and they chose to raise me. Wanted survivors commonly feel that they somehow need to prove their right to life, as if their parents might retroactively abort them or in my case take me off life support. This is not possible of course, but I can completely relate to this feeling.

That being said, over the past week I’ve felt a roller coaster of emotions as I read two books. One is For the Love of Babies by Sue Hall, which I reviewed on Friday. The other is Preemie Voices by Saroj Saigal. I will review this book too when I’m finished. It contains a collection of letters from former preemies who are now in their thirties. They were born between 1977 and 1982 and all weighed less than 1000 gram or 2lb 3oz. Some have disabilities and some do not. The aim of this book is to provide hope to parents of the preemies of today, but the author is also honest about the fact that some preemies still end up with severe disabilities. Of course, the book is directed at parents.

I feel validated at finally having found a book which includes the voices of adult preemies, after searching unsuccessfullly for a similar book published in like 1996 I’d heard of. Yet I still feel alone, because no-one had the experiences I did. Of course a book, unless I write it, cannot represent my perspective. Maybe I said this on the blog before, but if I ever write my autobiography, it’ll get the title of the 2004 newspaper article in which Dr. Fetter first uttered the “What have we done?!”. Its title is more optimistic: “Some former preemies will later go to university.”

The Reading Residence
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2 thoughts on “Preemie #WotW

  1. I have to be entirely honest and say that I’ve never thought about grown up preemies and how that must be. I’ve been on the other end, talking with parents with premature babies. It does sound as though this has been on your mind a lot, and you’ve some very interesting reading there. Thank you for sharing with #WotW x

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  2. I am excited to see also that there is a book out from an adult perspective. I myself was a premie born in 1959 and have sired 2 premie boys; one in 1989 at 2lb 12 oz(30 wks), and the second in 2001 at 1 lb 8 oz(26 wks). It is hard to find any literature on the subject and less emotional support for the parents raising children with ‘invisible’ disabilities. My second was born abroad leaving me with less network of support when I brought my second premie home. Thanks for the review!

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